• Safety and efficacy of lung recruitment maneuvers in post-­‐operative pediatric cardiac surgical patients

      Morandi, Tiffany; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Willis, Brigham C. (The University of Arizona., 2013-03)
      OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the safety of lung recruitment maneuvers in post-operative pediatric cardiac surgical patients. To assess the ability of lung recruitment maneuvers to improve lung function. HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesize that ventilator recruitment strategies be well-­tolerated in cardiac patients, and that they may benefit such patients by improving physiologic variables such as lung function and oxygenation. METHODS: Sixty‐two pediatric post-operative cardiac surgical patients were randomly selected to include in this retrospective chart review. Study subjects were selected from all patients who met inclusion criteria in the year immediately following implementation of a lung recruitment protocol in a local free‐standing pediatric hospital. Physiologic variables before, during, and after lung recruitment were recorded as well as patient demographics, diagnoses, morbidities and mortality. RESULTS: A statistically significant increase in dynamic compliance of the lungs and renal non-invasive regional oximetry was noted immediately after each recruitment maneuver. There was no statistically significant change in blood pressure, heart rate or oxygen saturation during the maneuvers. There was a transient increase in central venous pressure during the maneuvers (average increase < 1 mmHg). Of the 62 patients, there were 7 cases of pneumonia and 5 cases of small pneumothorax, often resolving without intervention. Significance: Demonstrating recruitment maneuvers are safe in pediatric patients with cardiac disease will allow practitioners to confidently utilize them when caring for ventilated patients. Such patients may benefit from potential improvements in lung function and decreased ventilator-associated morbidities.