Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorOberman, Heiko A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFrymire, John Marshallen_US
dc.creatorFrymire, John Marshallen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-11T08:32:07Z
dc.date.available2013-04-11T08:32:07Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/279789
dc.description.abstractThis study examines some of the plague sermons of German Catholic preachers during the sixteenth century, the era of the Reformation. It takes the question, "What was preached?" and applies it to a hitherto neglected genre of sources to investigate how Catholic preachers responded to a recurring, pre-Reformation crisis---plague---and how they interpreted that crisis during an era of revolutionary religious change. Special attention is given to the themes of astrology and the causes of plague, interpretations of epidemic disease in terms of divine wrath, plague prevention and social discipline. By comparing some of the Catholic plague sermons with those of their Protestant counterparts, similarities emerge to reveal a shared "Catholic" tradition, just as differences become apparent that reflect many of the debates between the confessions in sixteenth-century Germany. The theme of Catholic preaching and the German Reformation itself, however, has received little attention in the field, despite the fact that scholars have begun to devote much research and exposition to Protestant sermons during the period. Contrary to common opinion--that Catholics failed to measure up to their evangelical counterparts in the pulpits--this study also sketches some of the contours of Catholic preaching during the first three decades of the Reformation: major preachers, the sources, and some of the themes they emphasized. Conceived as both a thesis and as an outline for further research, it is argued here that the Catholic response from the pulpits was of greater scope and higher quality than has hitherto been assumed.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Church.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, European.en_US
dc.titlePestilence and Reformation: Catholic preaching and a recurring crisis in sixteenth-century Germanyen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3016499en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41939281en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-26T00:28:32Z
html.description.abstractThis study examines some of the plague sermons of German Catholic preachers during the sixteenth century, the era of the Reformation. It takes the question, "What was preached?" and applies it to a hitherto neglected genre of sources to investigate how Catholic preachers responded to a recurring, pre-Reformation crisis---plague---and how they interpreted that crisis during an era of revolutionary religious change. Special attention is given to the themes of astrology and the causes of plague, interpretations of epidemic disease in terms of divine wrath, plague prevention and social discipline. By comparing some of the Catholic plague sermons with those of their Protestant counterparts, similarities emerge to reveal a shared "Catholic" tradition, just as differences become apparent that reflect many of the debates between the confessions in sixteenth-century Germany. The theme of Catholic preaching and the German Reformation itself, however, has received little attention in the field, despite the fact that scholars have begun to devote much research and exposition to Protestant sermons during the period. Contrary to common opinion--that Catholics failed to measure up to their evangelical counterparts in the pulpits--this study also sketches some of the contours of Catholic preaching during the first three decades of the Reformation: major preachers, the sources, and some of the themes they emphasized. Conceived as both a thesis and as an outline for further research, it is argued here that the Catholic response from the pulpits was of greater scope and higher quality than has hitherto been assumed.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_3016499_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
8.868Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record