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dc.contributor.advisorPlante, Elenaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlt, Mary
dc.creatorAlt, Maryen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-11T08:49:55Z
dc.date.available2013-04-11T08:49:55Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/280147
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the fast-mapping ability of young children with normal language (NL) and specific language impairment (SLI). It compared their ability to fast-map semantic and lexical information in different conditions. Children had to fast map visual information only, visual plus non-linguistic auditory information, and visual plus linguistic auditory information. Children with SLI performed worse than children with NL overall. They showed specific deficits when the task did not meet their expectations and when they were asked to map phonologically infrequent linguistic information. A nonword repetition task was correlated with both semantic and lexical fast-mapping. The findings are discussed in light of their support for a limited capacity model of processing, and for the need to evaluate children with SLI for semantic deficits.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Speech Pathology.en_US
dc.titleSemantic attributes and aural encoding: A study of young childrenen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3073186en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43426773en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T20:55:45Z
html.description.abstractThis study investigated the fast-mapping ability of young children with normal language (NL) and specific language impairment (SLI). It compared their ability to fast-map semantic and lexical information in different conditions. Children had to fast map visual information only, visual plus non-linguistic auditory information, and visual plus linguistic auditory information. Children with SLI performed worse than children with NL overall. They showed specific deficits when the task did not meet their expectations and when they were asked to map phonologically infrequent linguistic information. A nonword repetition task was correlated with both semantic and lexical fast-mapping. The findings are discussed in light of their support for a limited capacity model of processing, and for the need to evaluate children with SLI for semantic deficits.


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