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dc.contributor.advisorChoi, Christopher Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSuarez-Rey, Elisa Maria
dc.creatorSuarez-Rey, Elisa Mariaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-11T08:53:19Z
dc.date.available2013-04-11T08:53:19Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/280210
dc.description.abstractSubsurface drip irrigation was compared to sprinkler irrigation on bermudagrass turf during three consecutive years using tertiary treated wastewater. Irrigation amount required by each treatment, visual appearance of the grass, shoot biomass production, and soil salinity were measured, and potential management problems were identified. The amount of irrigation water applied via subsurface irrigation was similar or higher than that applied via sprinkler irrigation for a turf of similar quality. Shoot biomass production did not differ between both irrigation methods when similar amounts of water were applied. Soil salinity, measured as electrical conductivity, was monitored at the beginning and end of each season. The changes in electrical conductivity at the end of every irrigation season did not negatively affect the appearance of the turf in any of the years. Emitter clogging by root intrusion was identified as a potential problem in the subsurface drip irrigation system. A series of greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of different herbicides and acids at several concentrations on root intrusion into subsurface drip emitters. The first greenhouse experiment was a study intended to identify chemical concentrations that could inhibit bermudagrass root growth in soil without negatively affecting the visual appearance of the grass. As a result, two herbicides, trifluralin and thiazopyr, and one acid, phosphoric acid, were selected for a second greenhouse experiment. The second greenhouse experiment focused on the effects of the two herbicides and the acid on root intrusion into subsurface drip emitters. Only the emitters treated with thiazopyr at the highest dose were completely clean, root-free emitters.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Agronomy.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Agricultural.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Environmental.en_US
dc.titleSubsurface drip irrigation of bermudagrass turf in Arizona: Benefits and limitationsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3073260en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43476065en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-05T09:25:02Z
html.description.abstractSubsurface drip irrigation was compared to sprinkler irrigation on bermudagrass turf during three consecutive years using tertiary treated wastewater. Irrigation amount required by each treatment, visual appearance of the grass, shoot biomass production, and soil salinity were measured, and potential management problems were identified. The amount of irrigation water applied via subsurface irrigation was similar or higher than that applied via sprinkler irrigation for a turf of similar quality. Shoot biomass production did not differ between both irrigation methods when similar amounts of water were applied. Soil salinity, measured as electrical conductivity, was monitored at the beginning and end of each season. The changes in electrical conductivity at the end of every irrigation season did not negatively affect the appearance of the turf in any of the years. Emitter clogging by root intrusion was identified as a potential problem in the subsurface drip irrigation system. A series of greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of different herbicides and acids at several concentrations on root intrusion into subsurface drip emitters. The first greenhouse experiment was a study intended to identify chemical concentrations that could inhibit bermudagrass root growth in soil without negatively affecting the visual appearance of the grass. As a result, two herbicides, trifluralin and thiazopyr, and one acid, phosphoric acid, were selected for a second greenhouse experiment. The second greenhouse experiment focused on the effects of the two herbicides and the acid on root intrusion into subsurface drip emitters. Only the emitters treated with thiazopyr at the highest dose were completely clean, root-free emitters.


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