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dc.contributor.advisorKenski, Henry C.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorNabi, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.authorQuade, Carol Chang
dc.creatorQuade, Carol Changen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-11T08:53:45Z
dc.date.available2013-04-11T08:53:45Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/280218
dc.description.abstractTelevision news plays an increasingly important role in the interpretation of political events for most Americans, particularly when negative outcomes demand responsibility. The aim of this study was to assess if the major networks attributed more blame to the Republican Congress than to the President in their broadcast coverage of the 1995-1996 federal government shutdowns, to examine the news framing of this event, and to examine the characteristics of the audiovisual messages. Findings suggest that the Republican Congress was blamed more for the shutdowns and received more negative audio and visual attributions than the President. Findings suggest that while the networks presented the shutdowns through more strategy than issue frames, a human-interest frame was identified as a dominant theme throughout the coverage. Results did not support the hypothesized relationship between frames and visual images. Theoretical, methodological and applied implications for political media and suggestions for future research are advanced.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectMass Communications.en_US
dc.titleWho won the blame game? An audiovisual framing analysis of attributions of responsibility in the network coverage of the 1995-1996 federal government shutdownsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010213en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41611706en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-25T11:31:52Z
html.description.abstractTelevision news plays an increasingly important role in the interpretation of political events for most Americans, particularly when negative outcomes demand responsibility. The aim of this study was to assess if the major networks attributed more blame to the Republican Congress than to the President in their broadcast coverage of the 1995-1996 federal government shutdowns, to examine the news framing of this event, and to examine the characteristics of the audiovisual messages. Findings suggest that the Republican Congress was blamed more for the shutdowns and received more negative audio and visual attributions than the President. Findings suggest that while the networks presented the shutdowns through more strategy than issue frames, a human-interest frame was identified as a dominant theme throughout the coverage. Results did not support the hypothesized relationship between frames and visual images. Theoretical, methodological and applied implications for political media and suggestions for future research are advanced.


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