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dc.contributor.advisorCornell, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorCompanion, Michele L.
dc.creatorCompanion, Michele L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-11T08:56:48Z
dc.date.available2013-04-11T08:56:48Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/280272
dc.description.abstractCore notions from social movement research and Sociology of Law studies are integrated into development theory and power/inequality arguments to evaluate the relative importance of internal social organizations of groups, resource dependency, and the impact of the organizational learning process on Native American tribes' inclinations to take greater amounts of control over their economic, political, and social development. This frames development as a political problem, not just an economic one. An analytical model is developed that can be applied to many indigenous groups. This model is used to answer the following question: when new opportunities for sovereign expression are created through changes in the law, which sociological factors impact the ability to take advantage of it? This study raises and addresses some theoretical questions about the conditions under which collectivities opt for more self-determination and develop greater institutional autonomy. It also addresses public policy issues by identifying factors that have proven to be barriers for tribes to pursue greater degrees of self-determination.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Social Structure and Development.en_US
dc.titleEmbracing autonomy: The impact of socio-cultural and political factors on tribal health care management levelsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3089932en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44419776en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-05T09:49:06Z
html.description.abstractCore notions from social movement research and Sociology of Law studies are integrated into development theory and power/inequality arguments to evaluate the relative importance of internal social organizations of groups, resource dependency, and the impact of the organizational learning process on Native American tribes' inclinations to take greater amounts of control over their economic, political, and social development. This frames development as a political problem, not just an economic one. An analytical model is developed that can be applied to many indigenous groups. This model is used to answer the following question: when new opportunities for sovereign expression are created through changes in the law, which sociological factors impact the ability to take advantage of it? This study raises and addresses some theoretical questions about the conditions under which collectivities opt for more self-determination and develop greater institutional autonomy. It also addresses public policy issues by identifying factors that have proven to be barriers for tribes to pursue greater degrees of self-determination.


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