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dc.contributor.advisorChamberlain, Bruce B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLamartine, Nicole Christopher
dc.creatorLamartine, Nicole Christopheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-11T09:06:39Z
dc.date.available2013-04-11T09:06:39Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/280427
dc.description.abstractThe document presents a Curriculum of Voice Pedagogy for Choral Conductors based on the author's solo voice techniques derived from studio voice teaching. Included in the Curriculum is basic voice pedagogy for the chorister, a differentiation between choral warm-ups and voice exercises, five steps to cultivating undeveloped voices, the development of the undergraduate voice, and a sample semester outline of the curriculum. The Curriculum's effectiveness was tested by University Singers, an entry-level collegiate choral ensemble (n = 77), and a panel of six graduate choral conductors at the University of Arizona. Seven common choral tone (Color Voices, Intonation, and Vowel Modulation) and singer technique (Flexibility, Legato, Resonance, and Diction) issues and corresponding exercises from the Curriculum were chosen to be tested from an individual singer's standpoint and from a conductor's aural ensemble perspective. Each exercise was applied to excerpts of choral literature to test its effectiveness in helping a singer to develop the vocal skills demanded by choral music. All exercises were concluded to be successful in that singers understood the purpose, the execution, and the pedagogical function of each exercise, and were inclined to use them in future vocal experiences. In addition, all tested vocal exercises helped to develop singer technique for issues encountered in the choral literature. Furthermore, four of the seven exercises were found to have a positive effect on the ensemble's sound as judged by the panel of conductors. The ensemble sound was also positively affected by the exercises for other tested issues in six out seven cases. Results showed that a focus on building individual singer technique will improve the overall sound and vocal ability of the choral ensemble. Furthermore, individual improvement in Intonation and Legato positively influenced the ensemble sound for all other tested issues.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectMusic.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Music.en_US
dc.titleA curriculum of voice pedagogy for choral conductors: The effect of solo voice exercises on individual singer technique, choral tone, and choral literatureen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3108922en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44829176en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-05T11:30:38Z
html.description.abstractThe document presents a Curriculum of Voice Pedagogy for Choral Conductors based on the author's solo voice techniques derived from studio voice teaching. Included in the Curriculum is basic voice pedagogy for the chorister, a differentiation between choral warm-ups and voice exercises, five steps to cultivating undeveloped voices, the development of the undergraduate voice, and a sample semester outline of the curriculum. The Curriculum's effectiveness was tested by University Singers, an entry-level collegiate choral ensemble (n = 77), and a panel of six graduate choral conductors at the University of Arizona. Seven common choral tone (Color Voices, Intonation, and Vowel Modulation) and singer technique (Flexibility, Legato, Resonance, and Diction) issues and corresponding exercises from the Curriculum were chosen to be tested from an individual singer's standpoint and from a conductor's aural ensemble perspective. Each exercise was applied to excerpts of choral literature to test its effectiveness in helping a singer to develop the vocal skills demanded by choral music. All exercises were concluded to be successful in that singers understood the purpose, the execution, and the pedagogical function of each exercise, and were inclined to use them in future vocal experiences. In addition, all tested vocal exercises helped to develop singer technique for issues encountered in the choral literature. Furthermore, four of the seven exercises were found to have a positive effect on the ensemble's sound as judged by the panel of conductors. The ensemble sound was also positively affected by the exercises for other tested issues in six out seven cases. Results showed that a focus on building individual singer technique will improve the overall sound and vocal ability of the choral ensemble. Furthermore, individual improvement in Intonation and Legato positively influenced the ensemble sound for all other tested issues.


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