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dc.contributor.advisorEvans, Susan D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStorey, Syretha Orr
dc.creatorStorey, Syretha Orren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-11T09:17:33Z
dc.date.available2013-04-11T09:17:33Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/280569
dc.description.abstractDespite the more than 300 questions teachers ask on a daily basis, research indicates that teachers in elementary, secondary and post-secondary classrooms do not understand the power and potential of questions to advance student reasoning. It has been found that when teachers are taught to ask higher-level, open-ended, instructional questions, opportunities for student reasoning increases. However, there has been little research on the use of questions to advance reasoning in early childhood education. This research sought to determine the generalizability of available research on teacher questioning and reasoning to early childhood settings. Further, this research examined the effectiveness of a workshop developed by the researcher to teach teachers about the power and potential of questions. A quantitative examination of early childhood teachers' questioning techniques revealed that early childhood teachers' questioning techniques are similar to that of teachers in other settings. They were found to ask primarily lower-level, closed-ended and diagnostic questions. After participation in a workshop developed to improve the teachers' questioning techniques, the participants were found to ask more of the types of questions that advance reasoning.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Early Childhood.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
dc.titleTeacher questioning to improve early childhood reasoningen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3132260en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46708340en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-05T13:29:10Z
html.description.abstractDespite the more than 300 questions teachers ask on a daily basis, research indicates that teachers in elementary, secondary and post-secondary classrooms do not understand the power and potential of questions to advance student reasoning. It has been found that when teachers are taught to ask higher-level, open-ended, instructional questions, opportunities for student reasoning increases. However, there has been little research on the use of questions to advance reasoning in early childhood education. This research sought to determine the generalizability of available research on teacher questioning and reasoning to early childhood settings. Further, this research examined the effectiveness of a workshop developed by the researcher to teach teachers about the power and potential of questions. A quantitative examination of early childhood teachers' questioning techniques revealed that early childhood teachers' questioning techniques are similar to that of teachers in other settings. They were found to ask primarily lower-level, closed-ended and diagnostic questions. After participation in a workshop developed to improve the teachers' questioning techniques, the participants were found to ask more of the types of questions that advance reasoning.


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