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dc.contributor.advisorStauss, Joseph H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVaughan, Margaret Ann M.
dc.creatorVaughan, Margaret Ann M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-11T09:23:46Z
dc.date.available2013-04-11T09:23:46Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/280661
dc.description.abstractThis research examined Audubon magazine's representations of Indigenous peoples of the Americas. Textual and image analysis spanned the years 1960 to 2002. Text and images were analyzed using cultural studies methods of critical textual analysis, critical discourse analysis, and ethnographic content analysis. Some of these representations were compared to other environmental magazines. Analysis included nature writing and news stories that covered the Keep America Beautiful Campaign, the use of eagles by Native Americans, the Nez Perce Wolf recovery project, the U'wa struggle against oil companies, and other issues. Contributors utilizing nature writing genre often utilized brief references to Indigenous peoples. These references provided a way to make points about nature, identities, and Indigenous peoples. I concluded that the imagery was not monolithic across time or across a particular topic. The "ecological Indian" image was both challenged and reinforced. A vast array of Indigenous images supported the magazine's goals, one goal being the encouragement of activism among readers. Letters-to-the-editor served as a dialogic space for perspectives not represented in the magazine's articles.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectJournalism.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.title"How can you love the wolf and the Eskimo at the same time?": Representations of Indigenous peoples in nature magazinesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3145143en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47213024en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-05T14:19:31Z
html.description.abstractThis research examined Audubon magazine's representations of Indigenous peoples of the Americas. Textual and image analysis spanned the years 1960 to 2002. Text and images were analyzed using cultural studies methods of critical textual analysis, critical discourse analysis, and ethnographic content analysis. Some of these representations were compared to other environmental magazines. Analysis included nature writing and news stories that covered the Keep America Beautiful Campaign, the use of eagles by Native Americans, the Nez Perce Wolf recovery project, the U'wa struggle against oil companies, and other issues. Contributors utilizing nature writing genre often utilized brief references to Indigenous peoples. These references provided a way to make points about nature, identities, and Indigenous peoples. I concluded that the imagery was not monolithic across time or across a particular topic. The "ecological Indian" image was both challenged and reinforced. A vast array of Indigenous images supported the magazine's goals, one goal being the encouragement of activism among readers. Letters-to-the-editor served as a dialogic space for perspectives not represented in the magazine's articles.


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