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dc.contributor.authorBelmonte, Chari
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-12T21:20:00Z
dc.date.available2013-04-12T21:20:00Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/281152
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractBackground: In the United States, the prevalence of postpartum depression is 10-15%. There is limited study on the appropriate postpartum screening tool for Burmese refugees in the United States. Hypothesis: The Burmese and Karenni versions of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) are appropriate to use as a tool for screening postpartum depression in Burmese refugees. Aims: This study examines the views of Burmese refugees on the questions of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale as a routine screening for postnatal depression and their opinion and experiences on postpartum depression. Methods: A qualitative approach was chosen to complete this study. A medical student and a Burmese interpreter participated in a one-on-one interview with 30 Burmese women sharing their views and opinions on translated EPDS and postpartum depression. Results: Thirty Burmese women were interviewed in the Phoenix area. The qualitative analysis indicate that the EPDS screening turned out to be a useful and culturally appropriate tool for the Burmese refugees to screen postpartum depression in this specific population. Conclusions: Without consistent and culturally appropriate screening for Burmese women, it would be hard to treat Burmese women for postpartum depression. Our study shows that acceptability for routine screening with a translated EPDS amongst health visitors is possible to achieve. Using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in Burmese and Karenni language should be considered when seeing Burmese refugees in the clinic.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subject.meshDepression, Postpartumen
dc.titlePostpartum Depression Tool in Burmese Womenen_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorVeres, Sharryen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-14T22:01:19Z
html.description.abstractBackground: In the United States, the prevalence of postpartum depression is 10-15%. There is limited study on the appropriate postpartum screening tool for Burmese refugees in the United States. Hypothesis: The Burmese and Karenni versions of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) are appropriate to use as a tool for screening postpartum depression in Burmese refugees. Aims: This study examines the views of Burmese refugees on the questions of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale as a routine screening for postnatal depression and their opinion and experiences on postpartum depression. Methods: A qualitative approach was chosen to complete this study. A medical student and a Burmese interpreter participated in a one-on-one interview with 30 Burmese women sharing their views and opinions on translated EPDS and postpartum depression. Results: Thirty Burmese women were interviewed in the Phoenix area. The qualitative analysis indicate that the EPDS screening turned out to be a useful and culturally appropriate tool for the Burmese refugees to screen postpartum depression in this specific population. Conclusions: Without consistent and culturally appropriate screening for Burmese women, it would be hard to treat Burmese women for postpartum depression. Our study shows that acceptability for routine screening with a translated EPDS amongst health visitors is possible to achieve. Using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in Burmese and Karenni language should be considered when seeing Burmese refugees in the clinic.


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