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dc.contributor.authorCollins, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-12T21:47:59Z
dc.date.available2013-04-12T21:47:59Z
dc.date.issued2013-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/281173
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractObjective: The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of dysphagia in neonates treated with targeted body temperature reduction as compared to neonates who have not been exposed to hypothermia. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of encephalopathic neonates who were treated with hypothermia and who underwent a modified barium swallow (MBS). For comparison, a group of neonates who had been evaluated with MBS but did not receive hypothermic therapy was identified. This group consisted of non-encephalopathic patients. MBS results were qualified as either normal or abnormal. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of abnormal MBS results between the hypothermic and control groups (Fisher’s exact; P = 0.78). The odds ratio for abnormal MBS results in the hypothermia group relative to the control group was 1.2, with 95% confidence interval of 0.42 to 3.8. Significance: These data indicate that hypothermia does not seem to increase short term risk of dysphagia compared to the control group. There is no apparent association between hypothermia and dysphagia. This supports previous findings that hypothermia is a safe treatment for neural injuries in NICU patients.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn, Diseasesen
dc.titleDysphagia in Encephalopathic Neonates Treated with Hypothermiaen_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorMiller, Jeffreyen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T12:08:19Z
html.description.abstractObjective: The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of dysphagia in neonates treated with targeted body temperature reduction as compared to neonates who have not been exposed to hypothermia. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of encephalopathic neonates who were treated with hypothermia and who underwent a modified barium swallow (MBS). For comparison, a group of neonates who had been evaluated with MBS but did not receive hypothermic therapy was identified. This group consisted of non-encephalopathic patients. MBS results were qualified as either normal or abnormal. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of abnormal MBS results between the hypothermic and control groups (Fisher’s exact; P = 0.78). The odds ratio for abnormal MBS results in the hypothermia group relative to the control group was 1.2, with 95% confidence interval of 0.42 to 3.8. Significance: These data indicate that hypothermia does not seem to increase short term risk of dysphagia compared to the control group. There is no apparent association between hypothermia and dysphagia. This supports previous findings that hypothermia is a safe treatment for neural injuries in NICU patients.


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