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dc.contributor.authorKarbasi, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-12T23:45:35Z
dc.date.available2013-04-12T23:45:35Z
dc.date.issued2013-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/281195
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Myocardial protection strategies are a central component of neonatal arterial switch operations. Traditionally antegrade cardioplegia through the aortic root has been the method of delivery, but use of retrograde cardioplegia via the coronary sinus has become the standard of practice by many in the field. Methods: After obtaining IRB approval and informed consent, a retrospective chart review was done to assess outcomes between 48 patients receiving antegrade (n= 5) and retrograde (n= 43) cardioplegia during neonatal switch operations. Preoperative demographics and postoperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results: Patients from the retrograde cardioplegia group demonstrated a trend towards shorter postoperative ventilation days (6.67 +/- 8.57 vs. 10.2 +/- 10.1) and hospital length of stay (18.3 +/- 15.3 vs. 24.8 +/- 11.8) which were not statistically significant. Patients receiving retrograde cardioplegia demonstrated a trend towards an increased incidence of postoperative arrhythmias which was not statistically significant. The retrograde group also demonstrated an increased cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time (95.6 +/- 36.59 vs. 146.74 +/- 44.26) and a trend towards an increased aortic cross clamp (ACC) time (74.4 +/- 24.42 vs. 101.30 +/- 29.56) which was not statistically significant. All patients survived to discharge in both groups. With results trending towards shorter hospital length of stays, postoperative ventilation days and zero mortality in patients receiving retrograde cardioplegia, it can be utilized as a safe and efficacious strategy for myocardial protection during neonatal switch operations.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Arrest, Induceden
dc.subject.meshHeart Defects, Congenitalen
dc.titleMyocardial Protection Strategy Utilizing Retrograde Cardioplegiaen_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorWillis, Brighamen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-05T19:12:26Z
html.description.abstractIntroduction: Myocardial protection strategies are a central component of neonatal arterial switch operations. Traditionally antegrade cardioplegia through the aortic root has been the method of delivery, but use of retrograde cardioplegia via the coronary sinus has become the standard of practice by many in the field. Methods: After obtaining IRB approval and informed consent, a retrospective chart review was done to assess outcomes between 48 patients receiving antegrade (n= 5) and retrograde (n= 43) cardioplegia during neonatal switch operations. Preoperative demographics and postoperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results: Patients from the retrograde cardioplegia group demonstrated a trend towards shorter postoperative ventilation days (6.67 +/- 8.57 vs. 10.2 +/- 10.1) and hospital length of stay (18.3 +/- 15.3 vs. 24.8 +/- 11.8) which were not statistically significant. Patients receiving retrograde cardioplegia demonstrated a trend towards an increased incidence of postoperative arrhythmias which was not statistically significant. The retrograde group also demonstrated an increased cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time (95.6 +/- 36.59 vs. 146.74 +/- 44.26) and a trend towards an increased aortic cross clamp (ACC) time (74.4 +/- 24.42 vs. 101.30 +/- 29.56) which was not statistically significant. All patients survived to discharge in both groups. With results trending towards shorter hospital length of stays, postoperative ventilation days and zero mortality in patients receiving retrograde cardioplegia, it can be utilized as a safe and efficacious strategy for myocardial protection during neonatal switch operations.


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