Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFlippo, Edwinen_US
dc.contributor.authorReeder, Robert Roy*
dc.creatorReeder, Robert Royen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-18T09:25:18Zen
dc.date.available2013-04-18T09:25:18Zen
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/281999en
dc.description.abstractThis study assessed the importance of the first-line supervisor's knowledge of his subordinates' work. The impact of the supervisor's style of leadership served as a basis for comparatively evaluating the importance of the supervisor's knowledge. The criteria variables used were morale and productivity. Supervisors and subordinates representing routine and nonroutine work groups were tested. The routine group was represented by postal clerks and the nonroutine group by computer programmers. All subjects were chosen as a convenience sample and were U.S. Army personnel stationed in West Germany. Test results of seventy-eight subordinates and their supervisors were used in the analysis. The test to measure the job knowledge of postal workers was the only test which had to be specially prepared for this study. Internal consistency reliabilities indicated the test would be appropriate. Supervisors both ranked and rated their subordinates' productivity. Various other standard tests were used. The primary hypothesis of the study was that the first-line supervisor's knowledge of his subordinates' jobs has a greater impact on productivity and morale than the supervisor's leadership style. It was hypothesized that increases in the supervisor's knowledge would have favorable effects. Path analysis was employed as the method of evaluating the hypothesis. The layout of path diagrams reflect various other hypotheses of the researcher. The first path analysis model examined indicated additional variables should be considered. An expanded model indicated that knowledge is likely positively related to productivity though negatively related to morale. That portion of the hypothesis specifying that knowledge would have a greater impact than leadership style could not be justified by the analysis and interpretation of the diagrams. The participative style of leadership appeared to be more positively, causally related to productivity than the supervisor's knowledge.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectSupervision of employees.en_US
dc.subjectPersonnel management.en_US
dc.subjectSupervisors.en_US
dc.subjectEmployee morale.en_US
dc.titleTHE IMPORTANCE OF THE SUPERIOR'S TECHNICAL COMPETENCE IN THE SUBORDINATES' WORKen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8303405en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8125753en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b23485644en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-28T01:13:23Z
html.description.abstractThis study assessed the importance of the first-line supervisor's knowledge of his subordinates' work. The impact of the supervisor's style of leadership served as a basis for comparatively evaluating the importance of the supervisor's knowledge. The criteria variables used were morale and productivity. Supervisors and subordinates representing routine and nonroutine work groups were tested. The routine group was represented by postal clerks and the nonroutine group by computer programmers. All subjects were chosen as a convenience sample and were U.S. Army personnel stationed in West Germany. Test results of seventy-eight subordinates and their supervisors were used in the analysis. The test to measure the job knowledge of postal workers was the only test which had to be specially prepared for this study. Internal consistency reliabilities indicated the test would be appropriate. Supervisors both ranked and rated their subordinates' productivity. Various other standard tests were used. The primary hypothesis of the study was that the first-line supervisor's knowledge of his subordinates' jobs has a greater impact on productivity and morale than the supervisor's leadership style. It was hypothesized that increases in the supervisor's knowledge would have favorable effects. Path analysis was employed as the method of evaluating the hypothesis. The layout of path diagrams reflect various other hypotheses of the researcher. The first path analysis model examined indicated additional variables should be considered. An expanded model indicated that knowledge is likely positively related to productivity though negatively related to morale. That portion of the hypothesis specifying that knowledge would have a greater impact than leadership style could not be justified by the analysis and interpretation of the diagrams. The participative style of leadership appeared to be more positively, causally related to productivity than the supervisor's knowledge.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_8125753_sip1_w.pdf
Size:
6.950Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record