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dc.contributor.advisorCrano, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Susan Elaine, 1967-
dc.creatorMorgan, Susan Elaine, 1967-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-18T09:40:27Z
dc.date.available2013-04-18T09:40:27Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/282312
dc.description.abstractAlthough metaphor has been a subject of study for centuries, few experimental studies have attempted to demonstrate the persuasive power of messages containing metaphors. Moreover, it is rarely acknowledged that metaphors and analogies can serve as valuable tools to tailor messages to the values of culturally diverse populations. This dissertation outlines the utility of incorporating metaphors and analogies within persuasive messages and advances a method for generating culturally appropriate metaphors and analogies. The literature on the neurophysiological basis of figurative language processing is reviewed in an attempt to uncover the origin of the persuasive power of metaphor. This literature leads to the development of the concept of Literal Mindedness as a way to explain individual differences in responses to figurative language. The Literal Mindedness Inventory is developed as part of this dissertation research, and its convergent validity with Need for Cognition also is established. Finally, an experiment was conducted to test the effect of metaphors and analogies and Literal Minedness on persuasion. To assess the effect of metaphors and analogies on the reception of persuasive health messages (HIV prevention/pro-condom messages), nine messages representing three levels of metaphors and analogies were tested on outcome measures such as fear, efficacy, message evaluation, and knowledge and attitudes. The hypotheses advanced in this study were partially supported, and form the basis of a number of recommendations for future research.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Marketing.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Rhetoric and Composition.en_US
dc.titleMetaphorical messages and the literal-minded: Accounting for individual cognitive differences in the design of persuasive health messagesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729462en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.description.noteThis item was digitized from a paper original and/or a microfilm copy. If you need higher-resolution images for any content in this item, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34801832en_US
dc.description.admin-noteOriginal file replaced with corrected file October 2023.
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-05T16:41:14Z
html.description.abstractAlthough metaphor has been a subject of study for centuries, few experimental studies have attempted to demonstrate the persuasive power of messages containing metaphors. Moreover, it is rarely acknowledged that metaphors and analogies can serve as valuable tools to tailor messages to the values of culturally diverse populations. This dissertation outlines the utility of incorporating metaphors and analogies within persuasive messages and advances a method for generating culturally appropriate metaphors and analogies. The literature on the neurophysiological basis of figurative language processing is reviewed in an attempt to uncover the origin of the persuasive power of metaphor. This literature leads to the development of the concept of Literal Mindedness as a way to explain individual differences in responses to figurative language. The Literal Mindedness Inventory is developed as part of this dissertation research, and its convergent validity with Need for Cognition also is established. Finally, an experiment was conducted to test the effect of metaphors and analogies and Literal Minedness on persuasion. To assess the effect of metaphors and analogies on the reception of persuasive health messages (HIV prevention/pro-condom messages), nine messages representing three levels of metaphors and analogies were tested on outcome measures such as fear, efficacy, message evaluation, and knowledge and attitudes. The hypotheses advanced in this study were partially supported, and form the basis of a number of recommendations for future research.


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