Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBrown, Judith K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorIdris, Ali Mohamed, 1958-
dc.creatorIdris, Ali Mohamed, 1958-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-18T09:43:47Z
dc.date.available2013-04-18T09:43:47Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/282381
dc.description.abstractThe biological and molecular properties of Sinaloa tomato leaf curl virus (STLCV) were investigated to test the hypothesis that STLCV is a previously uncharacterized whitefly-transmitted geminivirus from North America. STLCV causes leaf curling and yellowing in tomato plants. STLCV was transmissible to N. benthamiana by sap inoculation, and to Solanaceous and Malvaceous species by the whitefly vector. STLCV has transmission characteristics like other persistent viruses, and was not transovarially passaged. PCR fragments containing the large intergenic region (IR) of the STLCV A and B components and coat protein gene (AR1) were cloned from STLCV-infected tomato, and their DNA sequences obtained. Regions 174 nt in length containing diagnostic sequences present in the IR of geminiviruses, and a putative ORF AR1 of 756 nt were identified. A and B component IR sequences were 97.9% identical, suggesting a homogeneous, bipartite viral quasi-species. Pairwise alignment (Wilbur-Lipman) of STLCV AR1 and those of subgroups I, II, and III geminiviruses indicated 22-81% similarity, whereas STLCV AR1 was 36-61% similar to subgroup III viruses, collectively, suggesting STLCV is a unique viral quasi-species (>90% = same virus). Multiple sequence alignment (Clustal) and parsimony analysis (PAUP) of IR or AR1 sequences supported placement of STLCV with Western Hemisphere subgroup III viruses. Both A and B types of the whitefly vector transmitted tomato yellow leaf curl (TYLCV-Th) and chino del tomate (CdTV) geminiviruses, and transmission frequencies increased with greater AAPs. TYLCV-Th was transmitted by both vectors at a higher frequency than was CdTV. The B type, indigenous to the Eastern Hemisphere, transmitted the Old World TYLCV-Th (87%) more effectively than the New World A type vector (63%). The Western Hemisphere CdTV, was transmitted more often by the A type whitefly (50%), also from the New World, than by B type (27%). PCR detection of geminiviruses in single whiteflies indicated virus ingestion occurred after a 0.5 h AAP. Detection frequencies increased in both whiteflies given longer AAPs (0.5-72 h), irrespective of virus tested. PCR primers were designed that effectively discriminate between Old and New World geminiviruses, and between monopartite and bipartite genomic organizations.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Molecular.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Microbiology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Plant Pathology.en_US
dc.titleBiological and molecular differentiation of subgroup III geminivirusesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738967en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37474455en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-18T12:48:54Z
html.description.abstractThe biological and molecular properties of Sinaloa tomato leaf curl virus (STLCV) were investigated to test the hypothesis that STLCV is a previously uncharacterized whitefly-transmitted geminivirus from North America. STLCV causes leaf curling and yellowing in tomato plants. STLCV was transmissible to N. benthamiana by sap inoculation, and to Solanaceous and Malvaceous species by the whitefly vector. STLCV has transmission characteristics like other persistent viruses, and was not transovarially passaged. PCR fragments containing the large intergenic region (IR) of the STLCV A and B components and coat protein gene (AR1) were cloned from STLCV-infected tomato, and their DNA sequences obtained. Regions 174 nt in length containing diagnostic sequences present in the IR of geminiviruses, and a putative ORF AR1 of 756 nt were identified. A and B component IR sequences were 97.9% identical, suggesting a homogeneous, bipartite viral quasi-species. Pairwise alignment (Wilbur-Lipman) of STLCV AR1 and those of subgroups I, II, and III geminiviruses indicated 22-81% similarity, whereas STLCV AR1 was 36-61% similar to subgroup III viruses, collectively, suggesting STLCV is a unique viral quasi-species (>90% = same virus). Multiple sequence alignment (Clustal) and parsimony analysis (PAUP) of IR or AR1 sequences supported placement of STLCV with Western Hemisphere subgroup III viruses. Both A and B types of the whitefly vector transmitted tomato yellow leaf curl (TYLCV-Th) and chino del tomate (CdTV) geminiviruses, and transmission frequencies increased with greater AAPs. TYLCV-Th was transmitted by both vectors at a higher frequency than was CdTV. The B type, indigenous to the Eastern Hemisphere, transmitted the Old World TYLCV-Th (87%) more effectively than the New World A type vector (63%). The Western Hemisphere CdTV, was transmitted more often by the A type whitefly (50%), also from the New World, than by B type (27%). PCR detection of geminiviruses in single whiteflies indicated virus ingestion occurred after a 0.5 h AAP. Detection frequencies increased in both whiteflies given longer AAPs (0.5-72 h), irrespective of virus tested. PCR primers were designed that effectively discriminate between Old and New World geminiviruses, and between monopartite and bipartite genomic organizations.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_9738967_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
2.751Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record