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dc.contributor.advisorYeh, Tian-Chyi J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChaoka, Thebeyame Ron
dc.creatorChaoka, Thebeyame Ronen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-18T09:47:09Z
dc.date.available2013-04-18T09:47:09Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/282439
dc.description.abstractThe migration of tritium during a large-scale natural-gradient tracer experiment in Columbus, Mississippi, was simulated using a three-dimensional finite element model for water flow and transport. The results showed that modeling approaches that assume complete homogeneity of the aquifer or of hydrostratigraphic units within the aquifer failed to reproduce the temporal evolution of the first and second spatial moments of the experimental plume. In contrast, the simulation approach that accounted for aquifer heterogeneity gave first spatial moment estimates that were in good overall agreement with experimental results, but failed to simulate the second spatial moments of the tritium plume. The discrepancy between the experimental and simulated second spatial moments may be caused by the temporal and spatial variability of the actual boundary conditions which were not accounted for in the simulations. The failure of homogeneous approaches to simulate the evolution of the tritium plume raises serious questions about the utility of upscaled effective hydraulic properties for forecasting flow and solute transport in aquifers.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Civil.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Environmental.en_US
dc.titleThree-dimensional simulation of the Columbus tritium plumeen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806827en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37555868en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-05T18:06:05Z
html.description.abstractThe migration of tritium during a large-scale natural-gradient tracer experiment in Columbus, Mississippi, was simulated using a three-dimensional finite element model for water flow and transport. The results showed that modeling approaches that assume complete homogeneity of the aquifer or of hydrostratigraphic units within the aquifer failed to reproduce the temporal evolution of the first and second spatial moments of the experimental plume. In contrast, the simulation approach that accounted for aquifer heterogeneity gave first spatial moment estimates that were in good overall agreement with experimental results, but failed to simulate the second spatial moments of the tritium plume. The discrepancy between the experimental and simulated second spatial moments may be caused by the temporal and spatial variability of the actual boundary conditions which were not accounted for in the simulations. The failure of homogeneous approaches to simulate the evolution of the tritium plume raises serious questions about the utility of upscaled effective hydraulic properties for forecasting flow and solute transport in aquifers.


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