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dc.contributor.advisorBurgoon, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorCallister, Mark Alden, 1961-
dc.creatorCallister, Mark Alden, 1961-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-18T09:50:51Z
dc.date.available2013-04-18T09:50:51Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/282535
dc.description.abstractDrawing from research in involvement, message incongruency, schema theory and associative memory models, hypotheses were developed predicting that message incongruency will have differential effects on information processing within levels of high (HI) and low (LI) involvement subjects. It is argued that various characteristics of an executional cue may not affect HI and LI consumers in traditional ways prescribed by peripheral- versus central-route processes. Rather, the presence of incongruencies between the visual and verbal elements within a print ad may have a greater attractive force and motivate more thorough elaboration of pictorial and copy information than congruent elements. Although support for hypotheses was limited, cell means were remarkably consistent in the predicted directions and proportions, especially for recall of copy information and recall of the primary picture object. These patterns provide some support that the two dimensions of incongruency, relevancy and expectancy, do play a role in information processing for both high-and low-involvement consumers.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Marketing.en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
dc.titleRelevancy and expectancy: Incongruency's effect on high- and low-involvement consumers' processing of ad informationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814431en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.description.noteThis item was digitized from a paper original and/or a microfilm copy. If you need higher-resolution images for any content in this item, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37744252en_US
dc.description.admin-noteOriginal file replaced with corrected file October 2023.
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-05T19:14:00Z
html.description.abstractDrawing from research in involvement, message incongruency, schema theory and associative memory models, hypotheses were developed predicting that message incongruency will have differential effects on information processing within levels of high (HI) and low (LI) involvement subjects. It is argued that various characteristics of an executional cue may not affect HI and LI consumers in traditional ways prescribed by peripheral- versus central-route processes. Rather, the presence of incongruencies between the visual and verbal elements within a print ad may have a greater attractive force and motivate more thorough elaboration of pictorial and copy information than congruent elements. Although support for hypotheses was limited, cell means were remarkably consistent in the predicted directions and proportions, especially for recall of copy information and recall of the primary picture object. These patterns provide some support that the two dimensions of incongruency, relevancy and expectancy, do play a role in information processing for both high-and low-involvement consumers.


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