Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBales, Roger C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcConnell, Joseph Robert, 1958-
dc.creatorMcConnell, Joseph Robert, 1958-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-18T09:51:58Z
dc.date.available2013-04-18T09:51:58Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/282556
dc.description.abstractOf the three primary atmospheric oxidants, hydroxyl radical, ozone, and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), only the latter is preserved in ice cores. To make quantitative use of the ice core archive, however, requires a detailed understanding of the physical processes that relate atmospheric concentrations to those in the snow, firn and thence ice. The transfer processes for H₂O₂ were investigated using field, laboratory, and computer modeling studies. Empirically and physically based numerical algorithms were developed to simulate the atmosphere-to-snow-to-firn transfer processes and these models coupled to a snow pack accumulation model. The models, tested using field data from Summit, Greenland and South Pole, indicate that H₂O₂ is reversibly deposited to the snow surface, with subsequent uptake and release controlled by advection of air containing H₂O₂ through the top meters of the snow pack and temperature-driven diffusion within individual snow grains. This physically based model was successfully used to invert year-round surface snow concentrations to an estimate of atmospheric H₂O₂ at South Pole. Field data and model results clarify the importance of accumulation timing and seasonality in determining the H₂O₂ record preserved in the snow pack. A statistical analysis of recent accumulation patterns at South Pole indicates that spatial variability in accumulation has a strong influence on chemical concentrations preserved in the snow pack.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Atmospheric Science.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.titleInvestigation of the atmosphere-snow transfer process for hydrogen peroxideen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814460en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.description.noteThis item was digitized from a paper original and/or a microfilm copy. If you need higher-resolution images for any content in this item, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3774513xen_US
dc.description.admin-noteOriginal file replaced with corrected file October 2023.
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-18T00:56:24Z
html.description.abstractOf the three primary atmospheric oxidants, hydroxyl radical, ozone, and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), only the latter is preserved in ice cores. To make quantitative use of the ice core archive, however, requires a detailed understanding of the physical processes that relate atmospheric concentrations to those in the snow, firn and thence ice. The transfer processes for H₂O₂ were investigated using field, laboratory, and computer modeling studies. Empirically and physically based numerical algorithms were developed to simulate the atmosphere-to-snow-to-firn transfer processes and these models coupled to a snow pack accumulation model. The models, tested using field data from Summit, Greenland and South Pole, indicate that H₂O₂ is reversibly deposited to the snow surface, with subsequent uptake and release controlled by advection of air containing H₂O₂ through the top meters of the snow pack and temperature-driven diffusion within individual snow grains. This physically based model was successfully used to invert year-round surface snow concentrations to an estimate of atmospheric H₂O₂ at South Pole. Field data and model results clarify the importance of accumulation timing and seasonality in determining the H₂O₂ record preserved in the snow pack. A statistical analysis of recent accumulation patterns at South Pole indicates that spatial variability in accumulation has a strong influence on chemical concentrations preserved in the snow pack.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_9814460_sip1_c.pdf
Size:
12.49Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record