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dc.contributor.advisorRaghavan, Srinien_US
dc.contributor.advisorHerbots, Nicoleen_US
dc.contributor.authorAtluri, Vasudeva Prasad, 1959-
dc.creatorAtluri, Vasudeva Prasad, 1959-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-18T09:56:49Z
dc.date.available2013-04-18T09:56:49Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/282650
dc.description.abstractEpitaxial growth, oxidation and ohmic contacts require surfaces as free as possible of physical defects and chemical contaminants, especially, oxygen and hydrocarbons. Wet chemical cleaning typically involves a RCA clean to remove contaminants by stripping the native oxide and regrowing a chemical oxide with only trace levels of carbon and metallic impurities. Low temperature epitaxy, T limits the thermal budget for the desorption of impurities and surface oxides, and can be performed on processed structures. But, silicon dioxide cannot be desorbed at temperatures lower than 800°C. Recently, hydrogen passivation of Si(111) has been reported to produce stable and ordered surfaces at low temperatures. Hydrogen can then be desorbed between 200°C and 600°C prior to deposition. In this work, Si(100) is passivated via a solution of hydrofluoric acid in alcohol (methanol, ethanol, or isopropyl alcohol) with HF concentrations between 0.5 to 10%. A rinse in water or alcohol is performed after etching to remove excess fluorine. This work investigates wet chemical cleaning of Si(100) to produce ordered, hydrogen-terminated, oxygen- and carbon-free surfaces to be used as templates for low temperature epitaxial growth and rapid thermal oxidation. Ion beam analysis, Tapping mode atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Secondary ion mass spectroscopy, Chemical etching, Capacitance-voltage measurements and Ellipsometry are used to measure, at the surface and interface, impurities concentration, residual disorder, crystalline order, surface topography, roughness, chemical composition, defects density, electrical characteristics, thickness, and refractive index as a function of cleaning conditions for homoepitaxial silicon growth and oxidation. The wetting characteristics of the Si(100) surfaces are measured with a tilting plate technique. Different materials are analyzed by ion beam analysis for use as hydrogen standards in elastic recoil detection of hydrogen on sample surfaces. The results obtained in this study provide a quantitative optimization of passivation of Si(100) surfaces and their use as templates for low temperature epitaxy and rapid thermal oxidation. Ion beam analysis shows that the total coverage of H increases during passivation of Si(100) via HF in alcohol, while Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that more complex termination than the formation of simple silicon hydrides occurs.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Chemical.en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Condensed Matter.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
dc.titleHydrogen passivation of silicon(100) used as templates for low-temperature epitaxy and oxidationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9829602en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3856340xen_US
html.description.abstractEpitaxial growth, oxidation and ohmic contacts require surfaces as free as possible of physical defects and chemical contaminants, especially, oxygen and hydrocarbons. Wet chemical cleaning typically involves a RCA clean to remove contaminants by stripping the native oxide and regrowing a chemical oxide with only trace levels of carbon and metallic impurities. Low temperature epitaxy, T limits the thermal budget for the desorption of impurities and surface oxides, and can be performed on processed structures. But, silicon dioxide cannot be desorbed at temperatures lower than 800°C. Recently, hydrogen passivation of Si(111) has been reported to produce stable and ordered surfaces at low temperatures. Hydrogen can then be desorbed between 200°C and 600°C prior to deposition. In this work, Si(100) is passivated via a solution of hydrofluoric acid in alcohol (methanol, ethanol, or isopropyl alcohol) with HF concentrations between 0.5 to 10%. A rinse in water or alcohol is performed after etching to remove excess fluorine. This work investigates wet chemical cleaning of Si(100) to produce ordered, hydrogen-terminated, oxygen- and carbon-free surfaces to be used as templates for low temperature epitaxial growth and rapid thermal oxidation. Ion beam analysis, Tapping mode atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Secondary ion mass spectroscopy, Chemical etching, Capacitance-voltage measurements and Ellipsometry are used to measure, at the surface and interface, impurities concentration, residual disorder, crystalline order, surface topography, roughness, chemical composition, defects density, electrical characteristics, thickness, and refractive index as a function of cleaning conditions for homoepitaxial silicon growth and oxidation. The wetting characteristics of the Si(100) surfaces are measured with a tilting plate technique. Different materials are analyzed by ion beam analysis for use as hydrogen standards in elastic recoil detection of hydrogen on sample surfaces. The results obtained in this study provide a quantitative optimization of passivation of Si(100) surfaces and their use as templates for low temperature epitaxy and rapid thermal oxidation. Ion beam analysis shows that the total coverage of H increases during passivation of Si(100) via HF in alcohol, while Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that more complex termination than the formation of simple silicon hydrides occurs.


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