Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMcPherson, J. Milleren_US
dc.contributor.authorMark, Noah, 1971-
dc.creatorMark, Noah, 1971-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-18T09:59:28Z
dc.date.available2013-04-18T09:59:28Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/282706
dc.description.abstractWhy do different kinds of people like different kinds of culture? I examine two answers to this question: the homophily model and the distinction model. These models are alternative explanations for the finding that different cultural tastes and practices are concentrated within different sociodemographic segments of society. To determine which model is the preferred explanation, I identify conflicting predictions generated by the models. The models imply different ecological processes. The homophily model predicts that cultural forms compete with each other for people: People are a scarce resource on which cultural forms depend; cultural forms are not a scarce resource for people. The distinction model predicts a dual ecology: Cultural forms compete with each other for people, and people compete with each other for cultural forms. Empirical tests with 1993 General Social Survey data support the homophily model and disconfirm the distinction model.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Theory and Methods.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Social Structure and Development.en_US
dc.titleCulture and competition: A critical test of homophily and distinction explanations for cultural nichesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9901668en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38806782en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-05T20:54:40Z
html.description.abstractWhy do different kinds of people like different kinds of culture? I examine two answers to this question: the homophily model and the distinction model. These models are alternative explanations for the finding that different cultural tastes and practices are concentrated within different sociodemographic segments of society. To determine which model is the preferred explanation, I identify conflicting predictions generated by the models. The models imply different ecological processes. The homophily model predicts that cultural forms compete with each other for people: People are a scarce resource on which cultural forms depend; cultural forms are not a scarce resource for people. The distinction model predicts a dual ecology: Cultural forms compete with each other for people, and people compete with each other for cultural forms. Empirical tests with 1993 General Social Survey data support the homophily model and disconfirm the distinction model.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_9901668_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
3.516Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record