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dc.contributor.advisorCalvert, Paul D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSouvignier, Chad William*
dc.creatorSouvignier, Chad Williamen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-25T09:59:45Z
dc.date.available2013-04-25T09:59:45Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/284190
dc.description.abstractComposites are known for their unique blend of modulus, strength, and toughness. This study focuses on two types of composites; organic-inorganic hybrids and the mineralization of highly swollen polymer gels. Both of these composite systems mimic the biological process of composite formation, known as biomineralization. Biomineralization allows for the control of the precipitating phase through an interaction with the organic matrix. This allows higher volume fractions of inorganic material than can be achieved by many traditional processing techniques. Solid freeform fabrication is a processing method that builds materials by the sequential addition of thin layers. As long as the material can easily be converted from a liquid to a solid, it should be amenable for this processing technique. Freeform fabrication has three distinctions from traditional processing techniques that may enable the formation of composite materials with improved mechanical properties. These are the sequential addition of layers, which allows a layer by layer influence of chemistry, the ability to form complex geometries, and finally, extrusion freeform fabrication has been shown to align fibers due to the extrusion of the slurry through a needle. Cracking and shrinkage still play a major role in forming solid parts. The use of an open mesh structure in combination with proper materials selection allowed the formation of highly loaded composite materials without cracking. The modulus values of these materials ranged from 0.1 GPa to 6.0 GPa. The mechanical properties of these materials were modeled.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectChemistry, Polymer.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
dc.titleSolid freeform fabrication of highly loaded composite materialsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983860en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40823325en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-18T22:49:19Z
html.description.abstractComposites are known for their unique blend of modulus, strength, and toughness. This study focuses on two types of composites; organic-inorganic hybrids and the mineralization of highly swollen polymer gels. Both of these composite systems mimic the biological process of composite formation, known as biomineralization. Biomineralization allows for the control of the precipitating phase through an interaction with the organic matrix. This allows higher volume fractions of inorganic material than can be achieved by many traditional processing techniques. Solid freeform fabrication is a processing method that builds materials by the sequential addition of thin layers. As long as the material can easily be converted from a liquid to a solid, it should be amenable for this processing technique. Freeform fabrication has three distinctions from traditional processing techniques that may enable the formation of composite materials with improved mechanical properties. These are the sequential addition of layers, which allows a layer by layer influence of chemistry, the ability to form complex geometries, and finally, extrusion freeform fabrication has been shown to align fibers due to the extrusion of the slurry through a needle. Cracking and shrinkage still play a major role in forming solid parts. The use of an open mesh structure in combination with proper materials selection allowed the formation of highly loaded composite materials without cracking. The modulus values of these materials ranged from 0.1 GPa to 6.0 GPa. The mechanical properties of these materials were modeled.


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