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dc.contributor.advisorWarnock, Tillyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Michael Anthony*
dc.creatorRobinson, Michael Anthonyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-25T10:02:52Z
dc.date.available2013-04-25T10:02:52Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/284274
dc.description.abstractEmploying ethnographic and case study research methods, this study attempts to examine student attitudes toward, and senses of purpose about, a first-year college writing course and their roles as students and writers within it. The study argues that students possess clear and highly articulated conceptions of writing classes, of writing's place both within and outside academia, and of themselves as students and writers. These conceptions, like all theories, exhibit both strengths and weaknesses. However, students rarely have the opportunity to engage in dialogue about their views on writing. Because of this, the students in this study generally accommodate themselves to, but compartmentalize, the writing course and the strategies they are exposed to in it. The study suggests, therefore, that writing teachers approach their students not as novices to be corrected concerning the "true" ways of writing, or rejected for their unwillingness to accept these truths. Rather, we should consider writing students an audience to be persuaded to a concept of writing both different from, and similar to, the concepts they already hold. This means that writing teachers must elicit, listen to, and engage with the writing conceptions of their students. Means for fostering this dialogue include having students create narratives of their writing development, asking students to develop mini-ethnographic language projects, and historicizing with and for them standard academic English style.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Rhetoric and Composition.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
dc.titleStrictly classroom: Ethnographic case studies of student expectations in first year compositionen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992097en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41169797en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-06T02:28:27Z
html.description.abstractEmploying ethnographic and case study research methods, this study attempts to examine student attitudes toward, and senses of purpose about, a first-year college writing course and their roles as students and writers within it. The study argues that students possess clear and highly articulated conceptions of writing classes, of writing's place both within and outside academia, and of themselves as students and writers. These conceptions, like all theories, exhibit both strengths and weaknesses. However, students rarely have the opportunity to engage in dialogue about their views on writing. Because of this, the students in this study generally accommodate themselves to, but compartmentalize, the writing course and the strategies they are exposed to in it. The study suggests, therefore, that writing teachers approach their students not as novices to be corrected concerning the "true" ways of writing, or rejected for their unwillingness to accept these truths. Rather, we should consider writing students an audience to be persuaded to a concept of writing both different from, and similar to, the concepts they already hold. This means that writing teachers must elicit, listen to, and engage with the writing conceptions of their students. Means for fostering this dialogue include having students create narratives of their writing development, asking students to develop mini-ethnographic language projects, and historicizing with and for them standard academic English style.


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