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dc.contributor.advisorFox, Danaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Debra
dc.creatorSmith, Debraen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-25T10:09:03Z
dc.date.available2013-04-25T10:09:03Z
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/284405
dc.description.abstractThis purpose of this dissertation is to investigate how four Mexican American male adolescents perceive their literacy within and outside of school. Particular attention is given to the literacies found in the family, gang, school, and juvenile court communities. Initially, the four Mexican American male adolescents who participated in this study were students in my alternative classroom. Later, I officially advocated for them and their families in the educational system. I worked with each participant for four years. Each participant is a member of a gang and has struggled with being successful in school. The ethnographic case study design of the research, enabled me to examine each participant's literacy story. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews, participant observation and field notes, and the gathering of written and visual artifacts such as school assignments, personal journals, individual tags, personally written raps, and photographs. Data were organized into "case study data bases" and each participant's story contributed to a larger discussion of the individual communities in which the four members participated. The research revealed that all four participants come from rich literacy environments and that the social and political roles of literacy varied within the different communities. These multiple roles controlled the participants' use of literacies to navigate within the educational and juvenile court systems.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Language and Literature.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondary.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.titleAdolescent male gang members' literacy experiences within and outside of schoolen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9927525en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39570769en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-06T02:18:52Z
html.description.abstractThis purpose of this dissertation is to investigate how four Mexican American male adolescents perceive their literacy within and outside of school. Particular attention is given to the literacies found in the family, gang, school, and juvenile court communities. Initially, the four Mexican American male adolescents who participated in this study were students in my alternative classroom. Later, I officially advocated for them and their families in the educational system. I worked with each participant for four years. Each participant is a member of a gang and has struggled with being successful in school. The ethnographic case study design of the research, enabled me to examine each participant's literacy story. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews, participant observation and field notes, and the gathering of written and visual artifacts such as school assignments, personal journals, individual tags, personally written raps, and photographs. Data were organized into "case study data bases" and each participant's story contributed to a larger discussion of the individual communities in which the four members participated. The research revealed that all four participants come from rich literacy environments and that the social and political roles of literacy varied within the different communities. These multiple roles controlled the participants' use of literacies to navigate within the educational and juvenile court systems.


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