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dc.contributor.advisorDixon, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCorntassel, Jeffrey Jay
dc.creatorCorntassel, Jeffrey Jayen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-25T10:18:47Zen
dc.date.available2013-04-25T10:18:47Zen
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/284616en
dc.description.abstractContemporary military conflicts are not likely to occur between states but rather within states. Recent examples, such as the ongoing Chechen-Russian war, Kosovar resistance to Serbian ethnic-cleansing, Mayan (Zapatistas) autonomy claims in Mexico, and the Ogoni struggle for land control in Nigeria testify to the diversity and scope of ongoing state versus nation conflicts. Since most states "host" several ethnonational or indigenous groups within their borders, an examination of the conditions under which internal geopolitical faultlines (or historical/cultural divisions) transform into militarized disputes is warranted. Several theories of separatism guide the two general research questions for this project. First, what prompts some separatist groups to demand secession from the host state(s) while other groups seek greater autonomy within the host state(s)? Second, what specific group characteristics contribute to a separatist group's involvement in intrastate war? Using logistic regression analysis, the findings suggest that when a group is highly concentrated on the homeland, is represented by a political party, and has more than one host state, groups tend to demand exit over autonomy. Also, political parties appear to be a very important indicator in determining a separatist group's mobilization toward intrastate war, essentially exposing ethnonationalist faultlines and further dividing the electorate. Finally, high group concentration can lead to involvement in interstate crises, which demonstrates how intrastate conflicts can transcend state borders. Specific conflict resolution techniques are offered in conclusion to promote accommodation by both separatist groups and host states. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.titleRemapping territorial faultlines: Conflicts between separatist groups and host statesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9934866en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39685007en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-02T08:15:30Z
html.description.abstractContemporary military conflicts are not likely to occur between states but rather within states. Recent examples, such as the ongoing Chechen-Russian war, Kosovar resistance to Serbian ethnic-cleansing, Mayan (Zapatistas) autonomy claims in Mexico, and the Ogoni struggle for land control in Nigeria testify to the diversity and scope of ongoing state versus nation conflicts. Since most states "host" several ethnonational or indigenous groups within their borders, an examination of the conditions under which internal geopolitical faultlines (or historical/cultural divisions) transform into militarized disputes is warranted. Several theories of separatism guide the two general research questions for this project. First, what prompts some separatist groups to demand secession from the host state(s) while other groups seek greater autonomy within the host state(s)? Second, what specific group characteristics contribute to a separatist group's involvement in intrastate war? Using logistic regression analysis, the findings suggest that when a group is highly concentrated on the homeland, is represented by a political party, and has more than one host state, groups tend to demand exit over autonomy. Also, political parties appear to be a very important indicator in determining a separatist group's mobilization toward intrastate war, essentially exposing ethnonationalist faultlines and further dividing the electorate. Finally, high group concentration can lead to involvement in interstate crises, which demonstrates how intrastate conflicts can transcend state borders. Specific conflict resolution techniques are offered in conclusion to promote accommodation by both separatist groups and host states. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)


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