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dc.contributor.advisorMonke, Ericen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLaFrance, Jeffrey T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKarlwolfgang, Andrew, 1958-
dc.creatorKarlwolfgang, Andrew, 1958-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T09:10:38Z
dc.date.available2013-05-09T09:10:38Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/288829
dc.description.abstractIt has long been asserted that taxation distorts the production decisions of timber land owners. More recently, claims have been that this does not occur because the tax is fully shifted into sawlog prices. This paper constructs a model of landowner choice between a property tax programme and a modified yield tax programme under the assumption of tax capitalization. Under tax shifting, the landowner will be indifferent between tax regimes. With tax capitalization owners of younger stands will elect to classify their stands for the modified yield tax programme. An empirical model of binary choice is evaluated using cross sectional forty level data from Cowlitz County, Washington immediately after implementation of the Reforestation Act of 1931. The empirical results suggest that landowners are responsive to differences in the taxing pattern in a manner conforming to the theoretical predictions consistent with tax capitalization. Additional results suggest that implementation of the alternate tax regime may have had little effect on tax defaults. The tax capitalization result is extended to derive expressions for pigouvian taxes designed to influence stand management, consistent with the increasing timber prices encountered in the postwar world.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, Agricultural.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, Public Administration.en_US
dc.titleAlternative forest tax regimes and tax capitalizationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9831824en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38634119en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-29T03:57:20Z
html.description.abstractIt has long been asserted that taxation distorts the production decisions of timber land owners. More recently, claims have been that this does not occur because the tax is fully shifted into sawlog prices. This paper constructs a model of landowner choice between a property tax programme and a modified yield tax programme under the assumption of tax capitalization. Under tax shifting, the landowner will be indifferent between tax regimes. With tax capitalization owners of younger stands will elect to classify their stands for the modified yield tax programme. An empirical model of binary choice is evaluated using cross sectional forty level data from Cowlitz County, Washington immediately after implementation of the Reforestation Act of 1931. The empirical results suggest that landowners are responsive to differences in the taxing pattern in a manner conforming to the theoretical predictions consistent with tax capitalization. Additional results suggest that implementation of the alternate tax regime may have had little effect on tax defaults. The tax capitalization result is extended to derive expressions for pigouvian taxes designed to influence stand management, consistent with the increasing timber prices encountered in the postwar world.


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