Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHammond, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Colleen Miriam, 1969-*
dc.creatorFitzgerald, Colleen Miriam, 1969-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T09:15:31Z
dc.date.available2013-05-09T09:15:31Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/288889
dc.description.abstractMorphology and syllable weight have both been shown to affect stress patterns, but these effects are analyzed in different ways. The theoretical goal of this dissertation is to propose a Optimality Theoretic model to account for how morphology influences stress, and to do this in a way that parallels the influence of weight upon stress. Prince (1990) lays out the W scEIGHT- scTO-S scTRESS P scRINCIPLE, formalizing the principle by which heavy syllables attract stress in quantity-sensitive systems. I argue for the M scORPHEME- scTO-S scTRESS P scRINCIPLE, a constraint that forces morphemes to attract stress in morphological stress systems. The W scEIGHT- scTO-S scTRESS P scRINCIPLE has a counterpart, the S scTRESS- scTO-W scEIGHT P scRINCIPLE, which forces stressed syllables to be heavy. The counterpart of the M scORPHEME- scTO-S scTRESS P scRINCIPLE is the S scTRESS- scTO-M scORPHEME P scRINCIPLE, which forces stressed syllables to belong to morphemes. This accounts for systems where epenthetic vowels resist stress assignment.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Modern.en_US
dc.titleO'odham rhythmsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729454en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3480111xen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-06T05:45:49Z
html.description.abstractMorphology and syllable weight have both been shown to affect stress patterns, but these effects are analyzed in different ways. The theoretical goal of this dissertation is to propose a Optimality Theoretic model to account for how morphology influences stress, and to do this in a way that parallels the influence of weight upon stress. Prince (1990) lays out the W scEIGHT- scTO-S scTRESS P scRINCIPLE, formalizing the principle by which heavy syllables attract stress in quantity-sensitive systems. I argue for the M scORPHEME- scTO-S scTRESS P scRINCIPLE, a constraint that forces morphemes to attract stress in morphological stress systems. The W scEIGHT- scTO-S scTRESS P scRINCIPLE has a counterpart, the S scTRESS- scTO-W scEIGHT P scRINCIPLE, which forces stressed syllables to be heavy. The counterpart of the M scORPHEME- scTO-S scTRESS P scRINCIPLE is the S scTRESS- scTO-M scORPHEME P scRINCIPLE, which forces stressed syllables to belong to morphemes. This accounts for systems where epenthetic vowels resist stress assignment.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_9729454_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
4.720Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record