Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorConnolly, Terrenceen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoughlan, Richard Shannon, 1967-
dc.creatorCoughlan, Richard Shannon, 1967-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T09:19:12Z
dc.date.available2013-05-09T09:19:12Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/288937
dc.description.abstractThe three studies reported here examined the role of expectations in determining an individual's satisfaction with a real or hypothetical outcome. More specifically, this work looked at the accuracy of individuals in predicting their affective responses to expected and unexpected outcomes in various settings. Finally, three variables thought to have an effect on affective response were manipulated in order to examine their role in judgments of satisfaction with outcomes. In the first study, undergraduate subjects read scenarios containing the expectations of an individual about some event. Subjects made predictions about how these individuals might feel about outcomes better than, worse than or the same as what had been expected. The second study involved the expectations of bowlers about their scores in an upcoming game. Prior to beginning the game, bowlers predicted their scores and what their affective responses would be for outcomes better than, worse than, or equal to their expectations. After the game, their responses were recorded and compared to the predictions. The final study involved the expectations of hotel managers about important measures of business productivity. Some time before the relevant outcome would be learned, managers made predictions about the outcomes and their affective responses to other potential outcomes better than, worse than, or equal to their expectation. These studies show that bowlers and managers do very well at predicting affective responses to outcomes, both expected and unexpected. This is especially true for one subset of our subjects, whose predicted affect curve closely resembles the actual responses.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Industrial.en_US
dc.titlePredicting affective responses to unexpected outcomesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9923163en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial Managementen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.description.noteThis item was digitized from a paper original and/or a microfilm copy. If you need higher-resolution images for any content in this item, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39471172en_US
dc.description.admin-noteOriginal file replaced with corrected file September 2023.
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-28T01:19:21Z
html.description.abstractThe three studies reported here examined the role of expectations in determining an individual's satisfaction with a real or hypothetical outcome. More specifically, this work looked at the accuracy of individuals in predicting their affective responses to expected and unexpected outcomes in various settings. Finally, three variables thought to have an effect on affective response were manipulated in order to examine their role in judgments of satisfaction with outcomes. In the first study, undergraduate subjects read scenarios containing the expectations of an individual about some event. Subjects made predictions about how these individuals might feel about outcomes better than, worse than or the same as what had been expected. The second study involved the expectations of bowlers about their scores in an upcoming game. Prior to beginning the game, bowlers predicted their scores and what their affective responses would be for outcomes better than, worse than, or equal to their expectations. After the game, their responses were recorded and compared to the predictions. The final study involved the expectations of hotel managers about important measures of business productivity. Some time before the relevant outcome would be learned, managers made predictions about the outcomes and their affective responses to other potential outcomes better than, worse than, or equal to their expectation. These studies show that bowlers and managers do very well at predicting affective responses to outcomes, both expected and unexpected. This is especially true for one subset of our subjects, whose predicted affect curve closely resembles the actual responses.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_9923163_sip1_c.pdf
Size:
8.074Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record