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dc.contributor.advisorCutietta, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBerke, Melissa Kay
dc.creatorBerke, Melissa Kayen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T09:34:42Z
dc.date.available2013-05-09T09:34:42Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/289135
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine if preschool children, specifically three- and four-year olds, were able to demonstrate recognition of chord changes and identify implied tonic-dominant chord changes as a result of age-appropriate instruction focusing on harmony. Sixteen preschool children (7, three-year-olds; 9, four-year-olds) were given 10, 15-minute lessons that consisted of activities designed to enhance their awareness of harmony. Following instruction, students were given a test that measured their ability to recognize chord changes with regular and irregular harmonic rhythm. Furthermore, subjects were asked to demonstrate audiation of the implied harmony in three unaccompanied melodies by performing chord changes on an electronic keyboard. Results indicated that preschool children (94%) could recognize tonic-dominant chord changes, especially when they occurred in a regular harmonic rhythm. A majority of students (69%) also showed mastery when chords were played in an irregular harmonic rhythm. Students were unable to demonstrate mastery in any of the audiation tasks. Following the 10-week treatment, eight of the original subjects continued for an additional 10 sessions. Instructional and testing procedures remained the same. The scores from the 10- and 20-week tests were compared using a repeated-measures ANOVA. Students showed significant improvement in their ability to recognize chord changes that were played in an irregular harmonic rhythm. A moderate correlation was found to exist between age and this same task.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Early Childhood.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Music.en_US
dc.titleThe ability of preschool children to recognize chord changes and audiate implied harmonyen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9972076en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40637992en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-29T07:19:18Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine if preschool children, specifically three- and four-year olds, were able to demonstrate recognition of chord changes and identify implied tonic-dominant chord changes as a result of age-appropriate instruction focusing on harmony. Sixteen preschool children (7, three-year-olds; 9, four-year-olds) were given 10, 15-minute lessons that consisted of activities designed to enhance their awareness of harmony. Following instruction, students were given a test that measured their ability to recognize chord changes with regular and irregular harmonic rhythm. Furthermore, subjects were asked to demonstrate audiation of the implied harmony in three unaccompanied melodies by performing chord changes on an electronic keyboard. Results indicated that preschool children (94%) could recognize tonic-dominant chord changes, especially when they occurred in a regular harmonic rhythm. A majority of students (69%) also showed mastery when chords were played in an irregular harmonic rhythm. Students were unable to demonstrate mastery in any of the audiation tasks. Following the 10-week treatment, eight of the original subjects continued for an additional 10 sessions. Instructional and testing procedures remained the same. The scores from the 10- and 20-week tests were compared using a repeated-measures ANOVA. Students showed significant improvement in their ability to recognize chord changes that were played in an irregular harmonic rhythm. A moderate correlation was found to exist between age and this same task.


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