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dc.contributor.advisorGlisky, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorHermosillo-Romo, David
dc.creatorHermosillo-Romo, Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T09:38:26Zen
dc.date.available2013-05-09T09:38:26Zen
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/289184en
dc.description.abstractThe current theoretical formulation of bilingual memory (The Process View of Memory) assumes that all bilinguals are the same and thus attributes cross-language memory transfer effects to the processing components of memory tasks alone. However, the present study found that only early, but not late, bilinguals exhibited significant cross-language transfer effects in the implicit memory word fragment completion task under separate encoding conditions that involved perceptual, conceptual, and integrative processing (i.e., reading, imaging, and sentence processing). Results are taken to suggest that early and late bilinguals adopt different information processing strategies at encoding and retrieval, and question the notion of task processing demands as the only or main determinant of bilingual memory transfer. The present findings help explain the pattern of inconsistent bilingual transfer effects that have emerged in research studies conducted under the Process View of Memory and support the move toward the adoption of a bilingual memory paradigm in which cross-language transfer is explained in terms of both subject and task dimensions.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
dc.titleBilingual memory: A subject trait or a task dimensionen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983905en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40834190en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-29T07:32:05Z
html.description.abstractThe current theoretical formulation of bilingual memory (The Process View of Memory) assumes that all bilinguals are the same and thus attributes cross-language memory transfer effects to the processing components of memory tasks alone. However, the present study found that only early, but not late, bilinguals exhibited significant cross-language transfer effects in the implicit memory word fragment completion task under separate encoding conditions that involved perceptual, conceptual, and integrative processing (i.e., reading, imaging, and sentence processing). Results are taken to suggest that early and late bilinguals adopt different information processing strategies at encoding and retrieval, and question the notion of task processing demands as the only or main determinant of bilingual memory transfer. The present findings help explain the pattern of inconsistent bilingual transfer effects that have emerged in research studies conducted under the Process View of Memory and support the move toward the adoption of a bilingual memory paradigm in which cross-language transfer is explained in terms of both subject and task dimensions.


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