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dc.contributor.advisorDietz, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorLipori, Daniel George, 1966-
dc.creatorLipori, Daniel George, 1966-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T10:13:51Z
dc.date.available2013-05-09T10:13:51Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/289600
dc.description.abstractGeorg Wenzel Ritter (1748-1808) was one of the greatest bassoon players from the past. He was an indispensable part of the Mannheim orchestra, arguably the finest musical ensemble in Europe at that time. He was known all over Europe as a bassoonist with tremendous ability and frequently traveled abroad as a soloist. He also taught many students throughout his lifetime, including Etienne Ozi and Georg Brandt. The bassoon on which Ritter performed was a six-keyed bassoon. This instrument precedes the earliest known documented evidence of the six-keyed bassoon's existence by nearly fifteen years. Ritter also left us a fingering chart which lists an extreme range, going all the way up to eb2 Ritter composed several works which have been out of print for over 200 years or are only available in manuscript. These works include a set of quartets for bassoon, violin, viola, and bass instrument and a duet for two bassoons. These compositions give us an excellent indication of the high level of Ritter's playing ability through the many technically demanding passages. Moreover, other composers, including W. A. Mozart, knew Ritter's playing well and composed some of their own works with Ritter in mind for the bassoon parts. Some of Mozart's works for Ritter include the bassoon parts to the opera Idomeneo K366 and the Sinfonia Concertante for Winds K297b. Ritter is certainly an important figure in the history and development of bassoon playing and deserves more recognition as a prominent bassoon performer, teacher, and composer from the 18th century.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBiography.en_US
dc.subjectMusic.en_US
dc.titleGeorg Wenzel Ritter (1748-1808) and the Mannheim bassoon schoolen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738963en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37474224en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-29T10:40:23Z
html.description.abstractGeorg Wenzel Ritter (1748-1808) was one of the greatest bassoon players from the past. He was an indispensable part of the Mannheim orchestra, arguably the finest musical ensemble in Europe at that time. He was known all over Europe as a bassoonist with tremendous ability and frequently traveled abroad as a soloist. He also taught many students throughout his lifetime, including Etienne Ozi and Georg Brandt. The bassoon on which Ritter performed was a six-keyed bassoon. This instrument precedes the earliest known documented evidence of the six-keyed bassoon's existence by nearly fifteen years. Ritter also left us a fingering chart which lists an extreme range, going all the way up to eb2 Ritter composed several works which have been out of print for over 200 years or are only available in manuscript. These works include a set of quartets for bassoon, violin, viola, and bass instrument and a duet for two bassoons. These compositions give us an excellent indication of the high level of Ritter's playing ability through the many technically demanding passages. Moreover, other composers, including W. A. Mozart, knew Ritter's playing well and composed some of their own works with Ritter in mind for the bassoon parts. Some of Mozart's works for Ritter include the bassoon parts to the opera Idomeneo K366 and the Sinfonia Concertante for Winds K297b. Ritter is certainly an important figure in the history and development of bassoon playing and deserves more recognition as a prominent bassoon performer, teacher, and composer from the 18th century.


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