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dc.contributor.advisorHiskey, James Brenten_US
dc.contributor.authorPande, Preeti
dc.creatorPande, Preetien_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T10:34:52Z
dc.date.available2013-05-09T10:34:52Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/289709
dc.description.abstractThe safe disposal of arsenic-containing waste has been a difficult problem for the mining and metallurgical industry. One of the solutions to the arsenic problem is the precipitation of scorodite, an arsenic-containing mineral. Scorodite is reported to be relatively stable over a wide range of pH, and therefore may be a preferred disposal option. The effect of organic complexing agents on scorodite stability, however, is largely unknown. The present study is a phenomenological investigation into the dissolution kinetics of scorodite in the presence of oxalic acid under varying conditions of pH, oxalic acid concentration and temperature. The effect of scorodite particle size was also investigated. The morphological changes accompanying the dissolution process were examined by SEM and TEM analyses. Dissolution curves were divided into a linear induction period and a post-induction period. Activation energies were determined. Complete dissolution data were fit to the Prout-Tompkins/Austin-Rickett model. Dissolution data are indicative of auto-accelerated processes. The rapid increase in dissolution rate following the induction period is believed to be associated with an increase in the effective surface area. Pitting was observed on the surface of scorodite in the early stages of dissolution. In the later stages of dissolution, these pits were observed to grow and coalesce, in many cases resulting in the formation of dissolution holes.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Environmental.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
dc.titleThe dissolution behavior of scorodite in acidic environmentsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3026562en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42177509en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-06T10:08:43Z
html.description.abstractThe safe disposal of arsenic-containing waste has been a difficult problem for the mining and metallurgical industry. One of the solutions to the arsenic problem is the precipitation of scorodite, an arsenic-containing mineral. Scorodite is reported to be relatively stable over a wide range of pH, and therefore may be a preferred disposal option. The effect of organic complexing agents on scorodite stability, however, is largely unknown. The present study is a phenomenological investigation into the dissolution kinetics of scorodite in the presence of oxalic acid under varying conditions of pH, oxalic acid concentration and temperature. The effect of scorodite particle size was also investigated. The morphological changes accompanying the dissolution process were examined by SEM and TEM analyses. Dissolution curves were divided into a linear induction period and a post-induction period. Activation energies were determined. Complete dissolution data were fit to the Prout-Tompkins/Austin-Rickett model. Dissolution data are indicative of auto-accelerated processes. The rapid increase in dissolution rate following the induction period is believed to be associated with an increase in the effective surface area. Pitting was observed on the surface of scorodite in the early stages of dissolution. In the later stages of dissolution, these pits were observed to grow and coalesce, in many cases resulting in the formation of dissolution holes.


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