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dc.contributor.advisorGarrett, Merrill F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSuzuki, Toshiyuki
dc.creatorSuzuki, Toshiyukien_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T10:38:14Z
dc.date.available2013-05-09T10:38:14Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/289768
dc.description.abstractThis study presents the theory that language comprehension involves analyzing sentences into phonological structures, syntactic structures, and semantic structures. The interaction between the three levels of linguistic representation accounts for four stages of parsing: (a) &phis;-phrasing (i.e., combining words into phonological phrases), (b) attachment (i.e., attaching a phrase to an existing structure), (c) thematic interpretation (i.e., interpreting thematic relations), and (d) clausal analysis (i.e., processing a sentence clause by clause). Syntactic ambiguities are resolved through the four stages of parsing. This theory explains why some locally ambiguous sentences cause garden path effects whereas others do not and why some globally ambiguous sentences cause pun effects whereas others do not.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
dc.titleOn the garden pathen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3050283en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition and Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42723498en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-26T00:57:12Z
html.description.abstractThis study presents the theory that language comprehension involves analyzing sentences into phonological structures, syntactic structures, and semantic structures. The interaction between the three levels of linguistic representation accounts for four stages of parsing: (a) &phis;-phrasing (i.e., combining words into phonological phrases), (b) attachment (i.e., attaching a phrase to an existing structure), (c) thematic interpretation (i.e., interpreting thematic relations), and (d) clausal analysis (i.e., processing a sentence clause by clause). Syntactic ambiguities are resolved through the four stages of parsing. This theory explains why some locally ambiguous sentences cause garden path effects whereas others do not and why some globally ambiguous sentences cause pun effects whereas others do not.


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