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dc.contributor.advisorMcNaughton, Bruce L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Kari Lee
dc.creatorHoffman, Kari Leeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T10:44:52Z
dc.date.available2013-05-09T10:44:52Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/289891
dc.description.abstractThe process of forming a long-lasting memory may involve the selective linking together of neural representations stored widely throughout neocortex. The successful binding together of these disparate representations may require their coordinated reactivation while the cortex is 'offline' i.e., not engaged in processing external stimuli. This hypothesis was tested through simultaneous extracellular recording of 28-99 cells over four sites in the macaque neocortex. The recordings were conducted as the monkey performed repetitive reaching tasks, and in rest periods immediately preceding and following the task. In motor, somatosensory and parietal cortex (but not prefrontal cortex), the task-related neural activity patterns within and across regions were similar to the activity patterns seen afterwards, during the rest epoch. Moreover, the temporal sequences of neural ensemble activity that occurred during task performance were preserved in subsequent rest. The preservation of correlation structure and temporal sequencing are consistent with the reactivation of a memory trace and not merely the persistence of a fixed activity pattern. The observed memory trace reactivation was coordinated over large expanses of neocortex, confirming a fundamental tenet of the trace replay theory of memory consolidation.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Neuroscience.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Psychobiology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
dc.titleCoordinated memory trace reactivation across distributed neural ensembles in the primate neocortexen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3089967en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscienceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44422155en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-06T12:15:02Z
html.description.abstractThe process of forming a long-lasting memory may involve the selective linking together of neural representations stored widely throughout neocortex. The successful binding together of these disparate representations may require their coordinated reactivation while the cortex is 'offline' i.e., not engaged in processing external stimuli. This hypothesis was tested through simultaneous extracellular recording of 28-99 cells over four sites in the macaque neocortex. The recordings were conducted as the monkey performed repetitive reaching tasks, and in rest periods immediately preceding and following the task. In motor, somatosensory and parietal cortex (but not prefrontal cortex), the task-related neural activity patterns within and across regions were similar to the activity patterns seen afterwards, during the rest epoch. Moreover, the temporal sequences of neural ensemble activity that occurred during task performance were preserved in subsequent rest. The preservation of correlation structure and temporal sequencing are consistent with the reactivation of a memory trace and not merely the persistence of a fixed activity pattern. The observed memory trace reactivation was coordinated over large expanses of neocortex, confirming a fundamental tenet of the trace replay theory of memory consolidation.


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