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dc.contributor.advisorHolland, Audreyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMilman, Lisa Hope
dc.creatorMilman, Lisa Hopeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T10:50:04Z
dc.date.available2013-05-09T10:50:04Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/289982
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research was to develop a new test, the Scales of Cognitive and Communicative Ability for Neurorehabilitation (SCCAN). The SCCAN is intended to be used in the hospital setting to make appropriate treatment and discharge recommendations, and to guide more in depth assessment in other contexts. The test was designed to: (1) provide an overview of cognitive and communicative abilities in adult patients diagnosed with a variety of neurological disorders; (2) provide a measure of both impairment and functional ability; and (3) be administered in approximately 30 minutes. 20 neurologically healthy young controls and 20 neurologically healthy older controls were administered the SCCAN to ensure that these groups could complete the test successfully. The SCCAN and six standardized measures of cognition and communication were administered to 51 patients diagnosed with either left hemisphere stroke, right hemisphere pathology, or probable Alzheimer's disease. The SCCAN was re-administered to the patient group after a delay of 7 days. Data was analyzed using methods from both classical test theory and item response theory (IRT). The SCCAN demonstrated sufficient reliability across test administrations (r = .96), items (r = .99), and raters (percent agreement = .97). Findings also support the conclusion that this test provides an overview of cognition and communication that is appropriate for a broad range of patients. First, the test adequately distinguished the performance of separate subject groups (sensitivity = 98%, specificity = 95%). In addition, test scores correlated significantly with external measures of the same constructs (r = .41 to .91). Furthermore, a wide range of difficulty was observed among test items (item p-values ranged from 0 to 1). The fact that the SCCAN correlated significantly with a measure of impairment (r = .90) and functional ability (r = .94) suggests that this test provides a valid measure of both impairment and function. Lastly, results support the claim that the test can be administered in approximately 30 minutes. This test differs from similar instruments in terms of its comprehensiveness, providing a measure of both impairment and function, and incorporating a psychometrically validated decision tree to reduce test administration time.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Speech Pathology.en_US
dc.titleThe Scales of Cognitive and Communicative Ability for Neurorehabilitation (SCCAN): Development and basic psychometric propertiesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3108934en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44830038en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-17T09:20:12Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this research was to develop a new test, the Scales of Cognitive and Communicative Ability for Neurorehabilitation (SCCAN). The SCCAN is intended to be used in the hospital setting to make appropriate treatment and discharge recommendations, and to guide more in depth assessment in other contexts. The test was designed to: (1) provide an overview of cognitive and communicative abilities in adult patients diagnosed with a variety of neurological disorders; (2) provide a measure of both impairment and functional ability; and (3) be administered in approximately 30 minutes. 20 neurologically healthy young controls and 20 neurologically healthy older controls were administered the SCCAN to ensure that these groups could complete the test successfully. The SCCAN and six standardized measures of cognition and communication were administered to 51 patients diagnosed with either left hemisphere stroke, right hemisphere pathology, or probable Alzheimer's disease. The SCCAN was re-administered to the patient group after a delay of 7 days. Data was analyzed using methods from both classical test theory and item response theory (IRT). The SCCAN demonstrated sufficient reliability across test administrations (r = .96), items (r = .99), and raters (percent agreement = .97). Findings also support the conclusion that this test provides an overview of cognition and communication that is appropriate for a broad range of patients. First, the test adequately distinguished the performance of separate subject groups (sensitivity = 98%, specificity = 95%). In addition, test scores correlated significantly with external measures of the same constructs (r = .41 to .91). Furthermore, a wide range of difficulty was observed among test items (item p-values ranged from 0 to 1). The fact that the SCCAN correlated significantly with a measure of impairment (r = .90) and functional ability (r = .94) suggests that this test provides a valid measure of both impairment and function. Lastly, results support the claim that the test can be administered in approximately 30 minutes. This test differs from similar instruments in terms of its comprehensiveness, providing a measure of both impairment and function, and incorporating a psychometrically validated decision tree to reduce test administration time.


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