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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, S. Maeen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoch, Todd Richard
dc.creatorKoch, Todd Richarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T10:52:22Z
dc.date.available2013-05-09T10:52:22Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/290023
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the present study was to compare symptomatology evidenced by the MMPI-2 clinical scales and profiles of individuals with neurologic damage to the brain (NDB) and individuals with an Adjustment Disorder. The study was designed to investigate whether the MMPI-2 scales and profiles of individuals with NDB should be modified to account for the possible contaminating effect of "neurologic items" contained within the instrument's item pool (as espoused by Alfano, et al., 1991; Gass, 1991; Hamilton, et al., 1995). In addition, the relationships between demographic variables (age, education, marital status, and gender) and level of "emotional distress" conveyed via MMPI-2 clinical scale profiles within the NDB sample was examined. A retrospective sample was collected of 46 individuals who had been diagnosed with NDB and 46 individuals who had been diagnosed with an Adjustment Disorder by psychology staff at David Grant Medical Center (DGMC), Travis Air Force Base, California during the years 1990-1992. MMPI-2 clinical scales, overall means of the clinical scales, and clinical scale profile configurations were compared. The Adjustment Disorder sample group demonstrated a slightly greater level of symptomatology than did the NDB group, as measured by overall mean MMPI-2 clinical scale scores. However, no statistically significant differences were found between the NDB group and the Adjustment Disorder group, based on the above-described comparisons. In addition, no statistically significant differences were found within the NDB group on the four demographic variables. The results of the study provided evidence that applying a modification method to the MMPI-2 profiles of individuals with NDB, prior to interpretation, may result in an inaccurate appraisal of actual symptomatology.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Psychobiology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Personality.en_US
dc.titleThe psychological effects of traumatic brain injury, as measured by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010263en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41712298en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-29T14:35:55Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of the present study was to compare symptomatology evidenced by the MMPI-2 clinical scales and profiles of individuals with neurologic damage to the brain (NDB) and individuals with an Adjustment Disorder. The study was designed to investigate whether the MMPI-2 scales and profiles of individuals with NDB should be modified to account for the possible contaminating effect of "neurologic items" contained within the instrument's item pool (as espoused by Alfano, et al., 1991; Gass, 1991; Hamilton, et al., 1995). In addition, the relationships between demographic variables (age, education, marital status, and gender) and level of "emotional distress" conveyed via MMPI-2 clinical scale profiles within the NDB sample was examined. A retrospective sample was collected of 46 individuals who had been diagnosed with NDB and 46 individuals who had been diagnosed with an Adjustment Disorder by psychology staff at David Grant Medical Center (DGMC), Travis Air Force Base, California during the years 1990-1992. MMPI-2 clinical scales, overall means of the clinical scales, and clinical scale profile configurations were compared. The Adjustment Disorder sample group demonstrated a slightly greater level of symptomatology than did the NDB group, as measured by overall mean MMPI-2 clinical scale scores. However, no statistically significant differences were found between the NDB group and the Adjustment Disorder group, based on the above-described comparisons. In addition, no statistically significant differences were found within the NDB group on the four demographic variables. The results of the study provided evidence that applying a modification method to the MMPI-2 profiles of individuals with NDB, prior to interpretation, may result in an inaccurate appraisal of actual symptomatology.


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