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dc.contributor.advisorGreen, Richard F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Charles Tsun-Chu
dc.creatorLiu, Charles Tsun-Chuen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-09T11:34:43Z
dc.date.available2013-05-09T11:34:43Z
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/290658
dc.description.abstractThe star formation history of galaxies is the primary influence on galaxy evolution, and hence the evolution of almost all the visible matter in the universe. In this dissertation, I present studies of the star formation history of galaxies which have come from two distinct perspectives: the study of galaxies that have unusual star formation histories, and the search within the general galaxy population for galaxies with unusual star formation histories. A spectrophotometric atlas of 40 merging and strongly interacting galaxies is obtained and analyzed in order to examine their stellar populations and star formation histories. Within the sample, the subsample of 10 ultraluminous IRAS systems is compared with the optically selected subsample. The population of objects in the sample with anomalously strong Balmer absorption lines, a spectral signature indicative of post-starburst evolution, is examined and compared with distant "E+A galaxies" which have similar spectrophotometric properties. Spectrophotometry across the entire optical wavelength range is obtained and analyzed for a sample of 8 E+A galaxies, ranging in redshift from 0.09 ≤ z ≤ 0.54. The method of stellar population modeling, widely used with only minor variations in the astronomical community, is examined and its strengths and limitations are discussed.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Astronomy and Astrophysics.en_US
dc.titleThe star formation history of galaxiesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720588en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAstronomyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34518812en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-29T21:13:41Z
html.description.abstractThe star formation history of galaxies is the primary influence on galaxy evolution, and hence the evolution of almost all the visible matter in the universe. In this dissertation, I present studies of the star formation history of galaxies which have come from two distinct perspectives: the study of galaxies that have unusual star formation histories, and the search within the general galaxy population for galaxies with unusual star formation histories. A spectrophotometric atlas of 40 merging and strongly interacting galaxies is obtained and analyzed in order to examine their stellar populations and star formation histories. Within the sample, the subsample of 10 ultraluminous IRAS systems is compared with the optically selected subsample. The population of objects in the sample with anomalously strong Balmer absorption lines, a spectral signature indicative of post-starburst evolution, is examined and compared with distant "E+A galaxies" which have similar spectrophotometric properties. Spectrophotometry across the entire optical wavelength range is obtained and analyzed for a sample of 8 E+A galaxies, ranging in redshift from 0.09 ≤ z ≤ 0.54. The method of stellar population modeling, widely used with only minor variations in the astronomical community, is examined and its strengths and limitations are discussed.


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