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dc.contributor.advisorMilster, Tom D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGelbart, Asheren_US
dc.creatorGelbart, Asheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T09:21:31Zen
dc.date.available2013-05-16T09:21:31Zen
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/291356en
dc.description.abstractA novel bar code scanner that uses plane diffraction gratings on a flat rotating disk as the means of flying-spot laser scanning is designed and implemented. The design incorporates diffraction gratings that provide large angles of diffraction so that the lines generated in the bar code target region have sufficiently large radii for scanning most bar codes. The rotational symmetry exhibited by diffraction from plane gratings with incidence perpendicular to the grating surface is advantageous for the scanner system. The feasibility of the design is demonstrated by a prototype scanner consisting of commercially available diffraction gratings, an off-the-shelf focusing lens, and supporting optomechanical structures and electrooptics. The design concept is further developed towards fabrication and implementation of a custom-designed diffractive disk that can be readily injection molded with state-of-the-art Compact Disk (CD) replication technology. A stigmatic single-element focusing lens is also designed for the scanner system. Recent developments in diffractive optics mastering and replication technologies provide the impetus for this thesis; the possibilities of high efficiency mastering and inexpensive mass-replication of diffractive elements are driven by the semiconductor industry and continue to blossom. The diffractive disk designed in this thesis, however, does push the limits of the new technologies. A significant effort in creating a diffractive master for subsequent replication using a gray-scale mask microlithographic technology is presented. The thesis work falls short of an adequate master for replication. However, alternative mastering techniques for continuation of the project are suggested.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Electronics and Electrical.en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Optics.en_US
dc.titleDesign and fabrication of a diffractive bar code scanneren_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1398917en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40482030en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-19T19:51:37Z
html.description.abstractA novel bar code scanner that uses plane diffraction gratings on a flat rotating disk as the means of flying-spot laser scanning is designed and implemented. The design incorporates diffraction gratings that provide large angles of diffraction so that the lines generated in the bar code target region have sufficiently large radii for scanning most bar codes. The rotational symmetry exhibited by diffraction from plane gratings with incidence perpendicular to the grating surface is advantageous for the scanner system. The feasibility of the design is demonstrated by a prototype scanner consisting of commercially available diffraction gratings, an off-the-shelf focusing lens, and supporting optomechanical structures and electrooptics. The design concept is further developed towards fabrication and implementation of a custom-designed diffractive disk that can be readily injection molded with state-of-the-art Compact Disk (CD) replication technology. A stigmatic single-element focusing lens is also designed for the scanner system. Recent developments in diffractive optics mastering and replication technologies provide the impetus for this thesis; the possibilities of high efficiency mastering and inexpensive mass-replication of diffractive elements are driven by the semiconductor industry and continue to blossom. The diffractive disk designed in this thesis, however, does push the limits of the new technologies. A significant effort in creating a diffractive master for subsequent replication using a gray-scale mask microlithographic technology is presented. The thesis work falls short of an adequate master for replication. However, alternative mastering techniques for continuation of the project are suggested.


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