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dc.contributor.advisorGarber, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchroeder, Geralyn Mary, 1968-
dc.creatorSchroeder, Geralyn Mary, 1968-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T09:23:47Zen
dc.date.available2013-05-16T09:23:47Zen
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/291406en
dc.description.abstractArt history lessons were examined to determine fourth grade student abilities to study art and culture. The lessons were instructed in museum and classroom settings and focused on content central to Navajo rugs. The project did not present "traditional" linear or formalistic approaches to art history, but rather investigated alternative methods. The lessons included the following areas: (1) reality of the actual rug versus the illusion of the reproduction; (2) personal recognition of culture and physical place in comparison to an art object's; and (3) materials and processes used for production in relation to environment. Data from the study indicates students are capable of modeling a cultural art historical inquiry. These findings reveal new implications for art historical study with elementary students which reach beyond the concept of chronological historical analysis to include the component of culture.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Art.en_US
dc.titleThe changing field of art history: implications for instruction in a museum and a classroom settingen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1385742en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArten_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37460213en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-29T23:50:31Z
html.description.abstractArt history lessons were examined to determine fourth grade student abilities to study art and culture. The lessons were instructed in museum and classroom settings and focused on content central to Navajo rugs. The project did not present "traditional" linear or formalistic approaches to art history, but rather investigated alternative methods. The lessons included the following areas: (1) reality of the actual rug versus the illusion of the reproduction; (2) personal recognition of culture and physical place in comparison to an art object's; and (3) materials and processes used for production in relation to environment. Data from the study indicates students are capable of modeling a cultural art historical inquiry. These findings reveal new implications for art historical study with elementary students which reach beyond the concept of chronological historical analysis to include the component of culture.


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