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dc.contributor.advisorParry, Ellwood C., IIIen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeislin, Andrea Popowich, 1960-*
dc.creatorMeislin, Andrea Popowich, 1960-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T09:24:54Zen
dc.date.available2013-05-16T09:24:54Zen
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/291430en
dc.description.abstractCharles Frederick Ulrich (1858-1908) is best-known today for his paintings of figures at work, exhibited in New York between 1882 and 1884. By portraying both males and females at their work tables, Ulrich was showing middle-class individuals occupied with tasks informed by both knowledge and culture. This thesis describes these works as a way of exploring the artist's New York career, especially in regards to such current issues as immigration, labor, and social awareness. Charles F. Ulrich left no diaries, journals, or sketches to aid in the investigation of his artwork and life. While no verbal clues exist, this study reveals how Ulrich's work is filled with visual signs that invite interpretation. Not surprisingly, since he was raised in a household of German immigrant parents and spent several years of artistic training in Munich, Ulrich's pictures manifest, above all else, the strength of his German heritage.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBiography.en_US
dc.subjectArt History.en_US
dc.titleCharles Frederick Ulrich in New York, 1882 to 1884en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1383565en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArten_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3457945xen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-29T23:52:48Z
html.description.abstractCharles Frederick Ulrich (1858-1908) is best-known today for his paintings of figures at work, exhibited in New York between 1882 and 1884. By portraying both males and females at their work tables, Ulrich was showing middle-class individuals occupied with tasks informed by both knowledge and culture. This thesis describes these works as a way of exploring the artist's New York career, especially in regards to such current issues as immigration, labor, and social awareness. Charles F. Ulrich left no diaries, journals, or sketches to aid in the investigation of his artwork and life. While no verbal clues exist, this study reveals how Ulrich's work is filled with visual signs that invite interpretation. Not surprisingly, since he was raised in a household of German immigrant parents and spent several years of artistic training in Munich, Ulrich's pictures manifest, above all else, the strength of his German heritage.


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