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dc.contributor.advisorNichter, Marken_US
dc.contributor.advisorGreen, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoldade, Kathryn R.
dc.creatorGoldade, Kathryn R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T09:25:55Z
dc.date.available2013-05-16T09:25:55Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/291454
dc.description.abstractDespite generations of demographic scholarship, the everyday social practice of reproductive decision-making remains unclear. The objective of this thesis is to generate a theoretical framework for understanding the ways in which decisions of whether, when, and how often to have children are made. An expanded Gramscian concept of hegemonic process is developed, based on a review of anthropological, historical, and feminist literatures. Following a review of the anthropology of reproduction and demographic transitions, I illustrate the theoretical gaps for which hegemony is analytically well-suited. On a macro level of analysis, there is a focus on the historical relationship between race, reproduction, and the national body politic. A Foucauldian biopower expands the analysis by incorporating the experience of the individual, reproductive body, productive desires, and disciplinary techniques. Special attention is paid to stakeholders' concerns with the national body politic, such as identity definitions and limitations on the allocation of resources.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.titleThe micro-politics of population: Generating a theoretical approach to reproductive decision-making from the intersection of anthropology, history and feminismen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1414229en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44421187en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-29T23:59:02Z
html.description.abstractDespite generations of demographic scholarship, the everyday social practice of reproductive decision-making remains unclear. The objective of this thesis is to generate a theoretical framework for understanding the ways in which decisions of whether, when, and how often to have children are made. An expanded Gramscian concept of hegemonic process is developed, based on a review of anthropological, historical, and feminist literatures. Following a review of the anthropology of reproduction and demographic transitions, I illustrate the theoretical gaps for which hegemony is analytically well-suited. On a macro level of analysis, there is a focus on the historical relationship between race, reproduction, and the national body politic. A Foucauldian biopower expands the analysis by incorporating the experience of the individual, reproductive body, productive desires, and disciplinary techniques. Special attention is paid to stakeholders' concerns with the national body politic, such as identity definitions and limitations on the allocation of resources.


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