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dc.contributor.advisorGlisky, Elizabeth L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRouthieaux, Barbara Curchack, 1967-
dc.creatorRouthieaux, Barbara Curchack, 1967-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T09:34:03Z
dc.date.available2013-05-16T09:34:03Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/291637
dc.description.abstractSeveral researchers have hypothesized that implicit memory remains stable across the lifespan. Empirical support with children has been difficult to interpret due to methodological weaknesses including baseline variation, floor and ceiling effects, and lack of experimental dissociations. A new measure of repetition priming, the picture fragment completion task, was developed to account for these weaknesses while being appropriate for both children and adults. Adults and children aged 4, 6, and 8 (N = 156) completed either the picture fragment completion task or an explicit memory test made from same materials. Subjects of all ages performed equally on the priming test while performance increased with age on the explicit memory test. For all ages, the levels of processing manipulation affected only the explicit memory test. Thus, subjects were not using effortful strategies on the priming test. These results form a solid foundation for studying other developmental issues in implicit memory.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Experimental.en_US
dc.titleAnalysis of the early development of implicit memory: Characteristics, course, and implicationsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1353109en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27589572en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-30T01:42:35Z
html.description.abstractSeveral researchers have hypothesized that implicit memory remains stable across the lifespan. Empirical support with children has been difficult to interpret due to methodological weaknesses including baseline variation, floor and ceiling effects, and lack of experimental dissociations. A new measure of repetition priming, the picture fragment completion task, was developed to account for these weaknesses while being appropriate for both children and adults. Adults and children aged 4, 6, and 8 (N = 156) completed either the picture fragment completion task or an explicit memory test made from same materials. Subjects of all ages performed equally on the priming test while performance increased with age on the explicit memory test. For all ages, the levels of processing manipulation affected only the explicit memory test. Thus, subjects were not using effortful strategies on the priming test. These results form a solid foundation for studying other developmental issues in implicit memory.


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