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dc.contributor.advisorParezo, Nancy J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTroutman, John William, 1973-
dc.creatorTroutman, John William, 1973-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T09:35:22Z
dc.date.available2013-05-16T09:35:22Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/291662
dc.description.abstractThe 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis featured an anthropology exhibit consisting of living American Indians in order to display both stages in "civilization" and the benefits of federal Indian boarding school education for Indian children. Although fair organizers considered these the goals of the exhibit, the American Indians created their own experience at the fair. While the living conditions and the treatment of the native people were often deplorable, the American Indians found in many instances adventure and economic gain through selling their crafts to tourists. Analyzing the local and national media coverage of the exhibit provides an understanding of the racial and cultural ideologies disseminated throughout the country. This thesis combines a reconstruction of the American Indian experience with an analysis of the media coverage in order to understand more clearly the daily life and importance of the exhibit for all involved.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.titleThe overlord of the savage world: Anthropology, the media, and the American Indian experience at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Expositionen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1385757en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37476877en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-06T03:37:22Z
html.description.abstractThe 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis featured an anthropology exhibit consisting of living American Indians in order to display both stages in "civilization" and the benefits of federal Indian boarding school education for Indian children. Although fair organizers considered these the goals of the exhibit, the American Indians created their own experience at the fair. While the living conditions and the treatment of the native people were often deplorable, the American Indians found in many instances adventure and economic gain through selling their crafts to tourists. Analyzing the local and national media coverage of the exhibit provides an understanding of the racial and cultural ideologies disseminated throughout the country. This thesis combines a reconstruction of the American Indian experience with an analysis of the media coverage in order to understand more clearly the daily life and importance of the exhibit for all involved.


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