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dc.contributor.advisorHuelsman, Lawrence P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMerrill, Douglas Richard, 1962-*
dc.creatorMerrill, Douglas Richard, 1962-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T09:40:12Z
dc.date.available2013-05-16T09:40:12Z
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/291772
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to analyze the resonator filter, and to determine the effects of gain-bandwidth on the dominant complex conjugate pole pair. Optimization methods are then used as a design tool to determine the compensation required to shift the dominant pole pair back to their original design locations. New design values resulting from the compensation are used for the final circuit. Simulations are run to verify that the new design produces the desired magnitude response. The roots of the characteristic equation are checked to verify the proper location of the dominant pole pair. A comparison is made between the third order approximation and the fifth order one.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Electronics and Electrical.en_US
dc.titleGain-bandwidth effects on the resonator filteren_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1350792en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b25469472en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-25T19:29:02Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to analyze the resonator filter, and to determine the effects of gain-bandwidth on the dominant complex conjugate pole pair. Optimization methods are then used as a design tool to determine the compensation required to shift the dominant pole pair back to their original design locations. New design values resulting from the compensation are used for the final circuit. Simulations are run to verify that the new design produces the desired magnitude response. The roots of the characteristic equation are checked to verify the proper location of the dominant pole pair. A comparison is made between the third order approximation and the fifth order one.


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