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dc.contributor.advisorHowell, Wanda Hainen_US
dc.contributor.authorSteiniger, Laura, 1950-
dc.creatorSteiniger, Laura, 1950-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T09:45:56Z
dc.date.available2013-05-16T09:45:56Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/291896
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relationship between BMI and academic achievement in third-grade white females. Academic achievement was determined by classroom grades and standardized achievement test scores (e.g. CTBS). Also assessed were teachers' predictions for school success and teachers' perception of student behavior. The results of the investigation indicated no statistically significant differences in classroom grades between groups of "normal-weight" students and a group of obese students. However, teachers predicted less school success for obese girls and the highest degree of school success for the thinnest girls, and ANCOVA revealed statistically significant lower CTBS scores for obese girls. While MANCOVA of BMI and other confounding factors on CTBS scores showed BMI was not statistically significant, a relationship does exist. A model is proposed linking BMI and academic achievement through the mediating factors of teachers' predictions for success (teacher expectancies) and parents' level of education.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Elementary.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.titleThe relationship between body-mass index and academic achievement in third-grade white femalesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1386632en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciences and Dieteticsen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37563919en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-23T14:26:44Z
html.description.abstractThis study examined the relationship between BMI and academic achievement in third-grade white females. Academic achievement was determined by classroom grades and standardized achievement test scores (e.g. CTBS). Also assessed were teachers' predictions for school success and teachers' perception of student behavior. The results of the investigation indicated no statistically significant differences in classroom grades between groups of "normal-weight" students and a group of obese students. However, teachers predicted less school success for obese girls and the highest degree of school success for the thinnest girls, and ANCOVA revealed statistically significant lower CTBS scores for obese girls. While MANCOVA of BMI and other confounding factors on CTBS scores showed BMI was not statistically significant, a relationship does exist. A model is proposed linking BMI and academic achievement through the mediating factors of teachers' predictions for success (teacher expectancies) and parents' level of education.


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