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dc.contributor.advisorZiolkowski, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Sawyer Duane
dc.creatorCampbell, Sawyer Duaneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-04T18:19:02Z
dc.date.available2013-06-04T18:19:02Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/293420
dc.description.abstractCoated nanoparticles (CNP) are core-shell particles consisting of differing layers of epsilon positive (EP) and epsilon negative (ENG) materials. The juxtaposition of these EP and ENG materials can lead to the possibility of coupling incident plane waves to surface plasmon resonances (SPR) for particles even highly subwavelength in size. We introduce standard models of the permittivities of the noble metals used in these CNPs, and propose corrections to them based on experimental data when their sizes are extremely small. Mie theory is the solution to plane wave scattering by spheres and we extend the solution here to spheres consisting of an arbitrary number of layers. We discuss the resonance behaviors of passive CNPs with an emphasis on how the Coated nanoparticles (CNP) are core-shell particles consisting of differing layers of epsilon positive (EP) and epsilon negative (ENG) materials. The juxtaposition of these EP and ENG materials can lead to the possibility of coupling incident plane waves to surface plasmon resonances (SPR) for particles even highly subwavelength in size. We introduce standard models of the permittivities of the noble metals used in these CNPs, and propose corrections to them based on experimental data when their sizes are extremely small. Mie theory is the solution to plane wave scattering by spheres and we extend the solution here to spheres consisting of an arbitrary number of layers. We discuss the resonance behaviors of passive CNPs with an emphasis on how the resonance wavelength can be tuned by controlling the material properties and radii of the various layers in the configuration. It is demonstrated that these passive CNPs have scattering cross sections much larger than their geometrical size, but their resonance strengths are attenuated because of the inherent losses in the metals. To overcome this limitation, we show how the introduction of active material into the CNPs can not only overcome these losses, but can actually lead to an amplification of the scattering of the incident field. We report several optimized active CNP designs, including ones based on quantum dot gain media and study their performance characteristics with particular attention to the effect of the location of the gain material on the performance of these designs. We investigate the ability to control the scattered field directivity of the CNPs in both their far- and near-field regions and propose designs with minimal backscattering and those emulating macroscopic nanojets. We compare data generated by initial efforts to experimentally prepare CNPs and compare against analytical and numerical simulation results. Finally, we suggest a variety of interesting future research directions. resonance wavelength can be tuned by controlling the material properties and radii of the various layers in the configuration. It is demonstrated that these passive CNPs have scattering cross sections much larger than their geometrical size, but their resonance strengths are attenuated because of the inherent losses in the metals. To overcome this limitation, we show how the introduction of active material into the CNPs can not only overcome these losses, but can actually lead to an amplification of the scattering of the incident field. We report several optimized active CNP designs, including ones based on quantum dot gain media and study their performance characteristics with particular attention to the effect of the location of the gain material on the performance of these designs. We investigate the ability to control the scattered field directivity of the CNPs in both their far- and near-field regions and propose designs with minimal backscattering and those emulating macroscopic nanojets. We compare data generated by initial efforts to experimentally prepare CNPs and compare against analytical and numerical simulation results. Finally, we suggest a variety of interesting future research directions
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectmetamaterialsen_US
dc.subjectMie theoryen_US
dc.subjectnanoparticlesen_US
dc.subjectplasmonen_US
dc.subjectresonanceen_US
dc.subjectOptical Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectactiveen_US
dc.titleStudies of Passive and Active Plasmonic Core-Shell Nanoparticles and their Applicationsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTyo, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPau, Stanleyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZiolkowski, Richard W.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-30T06:27:18Z
html.description.abstractCoated nanoparticles (CNP) are core-shell particles consisting of differing layers of epsilon positive (EP) and epsilon negative (ENG) materials. The juxtaposition of these EP and ENG materials can lead to the possibility of coupling incident plane waves to surface plasmon resonances (SPR) for particles even highly subwavelength in size. We introduce standard models of the permittivities of the noble metals used in these CNPs, and propose corrections to them based on experimental data when their sizes are extremely small. Mie theory is the solution to plane wave scattering by spheres and we extend the solution here to spheres consisting of an arbitrary number of layers. We discuss the resonance behaviors of passive CNPs with an emphasis on how the Coated nanoparticles (CNP) are core-shell particles consisting of differing layers of epsilon positive (EP) and epsilon negative (ENG) materials. The juxtaposition of these EP and ENG materials can lead to the possibility of coupling incident plane waves to surface plasmon resonances (SPR) for particles even highly subwavelength in size. We introduce standard models of the permittivities of the noble metals used in these CNPs, and propose corrections to them based on experimental data when their sizes are extremely small. Mie theory is the solution to plane wave scattering by spheres and we extend the solution here to spheres consisting of an arbitrary number of layers. We discuss the resonance behaviors of passive CNPs with an emphasis on how the resonance wavelength can be tuned by controlling the material properties and radii of the various layers in the configuration. It is demonstrated that these passive CNPs have scattering cross sections much larger than their geometrical size, but their resonance strengths are attenuated because of the inherent losses in the metals. To overcome this limitation, we show how the introduction of active material into the CNPs can not only overcome these losses, but can actually lead to an amplification of the scattering of the incident field. We report several optimized active CNP designs, including ones based on quantum dot gain media and study their performance characteristics with particular attention to the effect of the location of the gain material on the performance of these designs. We investigate the ability to control the scattered field directivity of the CNPs in both their far- and near-field regions and propose designs with minimal backscattering and those emulating macroscopic nanojets. We compare data generated by initial efforts to experimentally prepare CNPs and compare against analytical and numerical simulation results. Finally, we suggest a variety of interesting future research directions. resonance wavelength can be tuned by controlling the material properties and radii of the various layers in the configuration. It is demonstrated that these passive CNPs have scattering cross sections much larger than their geometrical size, but their resonance strengths are attenuated because of the inherent losses in the metals. To overcome this limitation, we show how the introduction of active material into the CNPs can not only overcome these losses, but can actually lead to an amplification of the scattering of the incident field. We report several optimized active CNP designs, including ones based on quantum dot gain media and study their performance characteristics with particular attention to the effect of the location of the gain material on the performance of these designs. We investigate the ability to control the scattered field directivity of the CNPs in both their far- and near-field regions and propose designs with minimal backscattering and those emulating macroscopic nanojets. We compare data generated by initial efforts to experimentally prepare CNPs and compare against analytical and numerical simulation results. Finally, we suggest a variety of interesting future research directions


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