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dc.contributor.advisorEla, Wendell P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMunich, Chad Thomas
dc.creatorMunich, Chad Thomasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-06T19:26:24Z
dc.date.available2013-06-06T19:26:24Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/293541
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, energy capture by non-concentrating solar collectors is calculated using the Hottel-Whillier Equation (HW): Q(u)=A(c)*F(r)*S-A(c)*F(r)*U(l)*(T(fi)-Tₐ), or its derivative: Q(u)=A(c)*F(r)*S-A(c)*F(r)*U(l)*((T(fi)-T(fo))/2-Tₐ). In these models, the rate of energy capture is based on the collector's aperture area (A(c)), collector heat removal factor (F(r)), absorbed solar radiation (S), collector overall heat loss coefficient (U(l)), inlet fluid temperature (T(fi)) and ambient air temperature (Tₐ). However real-world testing showed that these equations could potentially show significant errors during non-ideal solar and environmental conditions. It also predicts that when T(fi)-Tₐ equals zero, the energy lost convectively is zero. An improved model was tested: Q(u)=A(c)F(r)S-A(c)U(l)((T(fo)-T(fi))/(ln(T(fo)/T(fi)))-Tₐ) where T(fo) is the exit fluid temperature. Individual variables and coefficients were analyzed for all versions of the equation using linear analysis methods, statistical stepwise linear regression, F-Test, and Variance analysis, to determine their importance in the equation, as well as identify alternate methods of calculated collector coefficient modeling.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectFlat Plate Solar Thermal Collectoren_US
dc.subjectHottel Whillier Equationen_US
dc.subjectStatistical Analysisen_US
dc.subjectThermal transporten_US
dc.subjectWater Treatment Technologiesen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectEnergy Capture Modelingen_US
dc.titleModeling of the Thermal Output of a Flat Plate Solar Collectoren_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArnold, Robert G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaez, Eduardo A.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T18:10:41Z
html.description.abstractTraditionally, energy capture by non-concentrating solar collectors is calculated using the Hottel-Whillier Equation (HW): Q(u)=A(c)*F(r)*S-A(c)*F(r)*U(l)*(T(fi)-Tₐ), or its derivative: Q(u)=A(c)*F(r)*S-A(c)*F(r)*U(l)*((T(fi)-T(fo))/2-Tₐ). In these models, the rate of energy capture is based on the collector's aperture area (A(c)), collector heat removal factor (F(r)), absorbed solar radiation (S), collector overall heat loss coefficient (U(l)), inlet fluid temperature (T(fi)) and ambient air temperature (Tₐ). However real-world testing showed that these equations could potentially show significant errors during non-ideal solar and environmental conditions. It also predicts that when T(fi)-Tₐ equals zero, the energy lost convectively is zero. An improved model was tested: Q(u)=A(c)F(r)S-A(c)U(l)((T(fo)-T(fi))/(ln(T(fo)/T(fi)))-Tₐ) where T(fo) is the exit fluid temperature. Individual variables and coefficients were analyzed for all versions of the equation using linear analysis methods, statistical stepwise linear regression, F-Test, and Variance analysis, to determine their importance in the equation, as well as identify alternate methods of calculated collector coefficient modeling.


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