• Collective Utility of Exchanging Treated Sewage Effluent for Irrigation and Mining Water

      Ko, Stephen C.; Duckstein, Lucien; Systems & Industrial Engineering, University of Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1972-05-06)
      The concept of collective utility is applied to a case study of alternative water resource utilization by providing a basis for comparing alternative uses of resources from the viewpoint of aggregate welfare. The exchange of sewage effluent for groundwater used by irrigation farmers, and the exchange of sewage effluent for groundwater used by processing and milling miners in Tucson, Arizona, are given as examples. Reviewed are collective utility concepts, case problems, definitions of problems, formulation of the model, and marginal change of collective utility. The first case has a collective utility of $800,500-g, where g represents unquantifiable factors, such as the reduction in quality of living due to the odor if solid waste exchanges. The second case has a collective utility of $175,000. Since it is likely that g will be on the order of $1 million per year, the first exchange is preferable to the second.
    • Evaluation of a Turfgrass - Soil System to Utilize and Purify Municipal Waste Water

      Sidle, R. C.; Johnson, G. V.; Department of Soils, Water and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1972-05-06)
      Sewage effluent for irrigation is well established. This study determines the capacity of selective turfgrass-soil systems to purify municipal sewage effluent and to measure the degree of utilization of nitrogen in the effluent by turfgrass. Chlorinated secondarily treated sewage effluent from the city of Tucson was applied to turfgrass grown on sandy loam, silt and loam, under three levels of irrigation under laboratory conditions of duplicate pots. Each pot had 2 suction probes to estimate soil moisture tensions and to allow soil water sampling. The study operated from September to March, 1972, for 30 weeks. Purification efficiency, nitrogen utilization and percent recharge were calculated. Turfgrass can be irrigated with sewage effluent at common rates without hazard of nitrogen pollution to groundwater. Purification efficiency exceeded 90 percent for all irrigation levels on sandy loam and silt. Nitrogen utilization was greater over sandy loam. Turfgrass-soil systems can utilize nitrogen and purify waste water.
    • Nitrogen Species Transformations of Sewage Effluent Releases in a Desert Stream Channel

      Sebenik, P. G.; Cluff, C. B.; DeCook, K. J.; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1972-05-06)
      A preliminary study was made with the objective of examining nitrogen species transformations of treated sewage effluent releases within the channel of an ephemeral stream, the Santa Cruz River of southern Arizona. Water quality samples were taken at established locations in sequence so that peak daily flows could be traced as the effluent moved downstream. Results indicate that increased nitrification, coinciding with changing stream characteristics, starts in the vicinity of Cortaro Road (6.3 river miles from the Tucson Sewage Treatment Plant discharge). Through physical-chemical changes in streamflow, nitrate -nitrogen values reach a maximum at approximately 90-95 percent and 60-80 percent of total flow distance for low flows and high flows, respectively. Concentrations of ammonia-nitrogen and total nitrogen decrease continuously downstream with both high and low flows. Therefore, the rate of nitrification within sewage effluent releases in a desert stream channel evidently is related to flow distance and physical characteristics of the stream.