• Optimal Livestock Production of Rehabilitated Mine Lands

      Brinck, Fritz H.; Fogel, Martin M.; Duckstein, Lucien; Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721; School of Renewable Natural Resources and Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721; Departments of Systems and Industrial Engineering and Hydrology & Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1976-05-01)
      Strip mining leaves behind spoils to be recontoured to maximize the benefit of livestock production on the rehabilitated land. This paper designs watersheds to achieve a balance between two main range livestock requirements, forage and stock water by way of grading and furrowing man-made slopes. The three design attributes, surface configuration, surface treatment, and range management policy are optimized with respect to maximal profit accounting for natural uncertainties in 3 variables, viz., time interval between storm arrivals, precipitation per storm event, and duration of the storm event. Runoff and sedimentation are modeled on an event basis as functions of said random variables. The stock water reservoir at the bottom of the watershed is dredged periodically. The stochastic model is applied to the Black Mesa in Northern Arizona which is in the process of being strip-mined for coal.
    • Laboratory Weathering of Water-Repellent Wax-Treated Soil

      Fink, Dwayne H.; U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, Arizona 85040 (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1976-05-01)
    • Stock-Water Harvesting with Wax on the Arizona Strip

      Cooley, Keith R.; Brazell, Loren N.; Frasier, Gary W.; Fink, Dwayne H.; U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Phoenix, Arizona 85040; Bureau of Land Management, St. George, Utah (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1976-05-01)
    • Water in Arizona: A Reporter's History

      Turner, Tom (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1976-05-01)
      Once Arizona sent National Guard troops to the Colorado River in an effort to counter California's claim on that River's water. Then, in following years, the farming interests dominated Arizona economy and politics. The farming interests promoted in their behalf the powerful Salt River Project, and the concept of groundwater as a property right. Over the years, agricultural power has held fast with only slight modifications in the basic groundwater law; this has inhibited the scientific assessment of Arizona's groundwater resources. Projections of the dire effects of groundwater policies first came from a few mavericks in the academic community. As facts have accumulated, these projections appear to be essentially correct. It is now evident that city, farm and industry can join to manage and conserve what is left of the dwindling water resource, or they can dry-up separately.
    • Reservoir Design under Random Sediment Yield

      Duckstein, L.; Szidarovsky, F.; Yakowitz, S.; Departments of Systems and Industrial Engineering and Hydrology & Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721; Department of Numerical Methods, Eötvös University, Muzeum körut, Budapest VIII, Hungary; Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1976-05-01)