• Reclamation of Orphaned Mine Sites and Their Effect on the Water Quality of the Lynx Creek Watershed

      Verma, Tika R.; Felix, Ernesto N.; School of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson; USDA, Forest Service, Prescott National Forest (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
      Lynx Creek Watershed is located eight miles southeast of Prescott, Arizona, on the Prescott National Forest. The watershed consists of 13,600 acres, which are National Forest Lands. Approximately 600 acres in the watershed are patented mining claims. Gold was discovered in Lynx Creek in 1863 and the watershed was extensively mined for gold, silver and copper. The aftermath of the mining has resulted in numerous mine shafts, waste dumps and mill tailing ponds that were abandoned after the ore was played out. Drainage from the orphaned mine sites contribute a certain extent of toxic mineral and sediment pollution into Lynx Creek and eventually into Lynx Lake. Lynx Creek carries runoff which is slightly acidic in nature and has high concentrations of copper, manganese, iron, zinc and sulfates. The mineral pollutants have reduced the recreational and fisheries potential of the Lake. The Sheldon Mine complex consisting of a waste dump and the mill tailing dump were considered the major sources of pollutants into the Lake. The Sheldon Tailings pond was rehabilitated during the summer of 1975 and the waste dump during the summer of 1976 as part of a reclamation study that is being sponsored by SEAM (Surface Environment and Mining). The study is being conducted cooperatively by the School of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Arizona, and the Prescott National Forest. Both sites were culturally treated and dressed with lime and topsoil. Studies are currently being conducted to measure the beneficial effects of the reclamation projects.
    • Decision Making in a Multiple-use Approach to the Reclamation of Strip-mined Lands

      Goicoechea, Ambroes; Duckstein, Lucien; Fogel, Martin; Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721; Departments of Systems and Industrial Engineering and Hydrology & Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721; School of Renewable Natural Resources, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
      With the advent of ever -increasing energy needs, large-scale surface mining has gained new impetus, and there is much concern about reclaiming the mine spoils to bring about beneficial land uses. This paper presents a decision making algorithm labeled PROTRADE, and a case study of the Black Mesa region in Northern Arizona. PROTRADE considers a set of objective functions, a set of physical constraints, articulates the preferences of the decision maker in a progressive manner, and generates a set of alternative solutions. The decision maker is then able to trade level of achievement, for each objective function, against the probability of achieving that level.
    • Nonpoint-Source Pollutants to Determine Runoff Source Areas

      Lane, L. J.; Norton, H. L.; Wallace, D. E.; Wilson, R. E.; Martin, R. D.; USDA, ARS, Tucson, Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
      Hydrologic information is needed to understand and control water pollution from semiarid rangelands. However, the hydrologic systems under any given conditions must be understood and the effects of various land uses predicted. Based on the concept of partial area response, a runoff tracer study was conducted on two small watersheds. The watersheds were partitioned into four geomorphic subzones or hydrologic response units. Each of the four zones on both watersheds was treated with about 1 kg/ha of an individual water soluble herbicide. Runoff volumes and sources estimated using the tracers were consistent with results from simulation studies. Also, the principle of corresponding runoff and pollutant discharge rates was used to develop two methods of runoff hydrograph estimation from each of the geomorphic subzones. Method 1 matched the mean total concentration and total runoff volume. Method 2 matched the instantaneous total concentration and the instantaneous runoff rate from the entire watershed. Results from the two methods suggested that, although they may be equivalent with respect to runoff volume, Method 2 may be more consistent with respect to peak discharge.
    • An Application of Multidisciplinary Water Resources Planning and Management for the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation: Gila River Case

      Novelle, M. E.; Percious, D. J.; Wright, N. G.; Office of Arid Lands Studies, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
      The Laboratory of Native Development, Systems Analysis and Applied Technology (NADSAT) was established to provide technical assistance to southwestern Indian Tribes as an aid in the development and use of their natural resources according to their goals and objectives. NADSAT 's role is assistance and technology transfer, with an emphasis on alternative formulation and performance analysis and communicating the technological approach to tribal decision makers. The cost-effectiveness methodology provides a coherent framework and affords a mechanism for technology transfer, which makes it a useful tool in achieving tribal goals. This method was applied to the formulation of possible alternatives for use of the land and water resources of the Gila River Basin within the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation. Criteria for devising various alternative utilization schemes are discussed, and the advantages of the cost effectiveness methodology.
    • Variations in Soil Moisture Under Natural Vegetation

      Sammis, T. W.; Weeks, D. L.; Agricultural Engineering Department, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces; Experimental Statistics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
      Soil water content was measured every two weeks during 1974-1975, using a neutron probe, at selected locations around the desert plant species creosote (Larria divaricata), bursage (Ambrosia deltoidea), and in an open space. The purpose of taking the measurements was to enable one to estimate the evapotranspiration rate of the desert plants by measuring soil moisture depletion. The sampling problem associated with measuring soil moisture, using neutron access tubes, is the number, location, and installation depth of the tubes. Analyses of the total soil moisture beneath the creosote plant showed greater variability between access tubes located near different plants the same distance from the crown of the plant than between tubes located around the same plant. Because of the size of the bursage plant, the variability in total soil moisture beneath the plant was greater among tubes around the same plant than between tubes at the same location at different plants.
    • Simulation of Summer Rainfall Occurrence in Arizona and New Mexico

      Yakowitz, Sidney; Southwest Watershed Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, Tucson, Arizona; Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
      Thunderstorms produce most of the annual rainfall and almost all runoff from arid and semiarid rangelands in the southwest U.S. A model was developed to be used for predicting runoff in river basins, flood plane zonings, estimating flood damage, erosion, and sediment transport, and estimating precipitation available for forage growth. This rainfall occurrence model has three parameters: elevation, latitude and longitude, and takes into account rainfall occurrence in 22 stations located in Arizona and New Mexico. From these variables, mathematical equations were developed in an effort to predict point rainfall occurrence. Estimates of the number of seasonal occurrences were used as a check of the equations within the model.
    • Diurnal Trends in Water Status, Transpiration, and Photosynthesis of Saltcedar

      Williams, Mary Ellen; Anderson, Jay E.; Department of Biology, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
      Relative water content (RWC), water potential (P), and gas exchange were measured on saltcedar at the Bernardo, New Mexico, lysimeter site. RWC and s were closely correlated; but, water potential measurements, taken with a pressure bomb, were more convenient and reliable. RWC and r decreased sharply from sunup until about 0900, when minimum values of about -26 bars T or 80% RWC were reached. Water status then remained constant or improved slightly through late afternoon. Transpiration rates typically remained high until about noon and then began a steady, gradual decrease that continued throughout the afternoon. The data suggest that water stress may be a factor in initiating stomatal closure; however, transpiration continued to decline despite a constant or improved leaf water status. Maximum net photosynthetic rates occurred by 0900, and depressions throughout the remainder of the day were largely accounted for by increased leaf temperatures. Afternoon depressions in transpiration and photosynthesis occurred in twigs held at constant temperature and relative humidity, suggesting that a diurnal rhythm may be involved in control of gas exchange. Water status of plants growing on the lysimeters was comparable to that of plants in adjacent natural stands; gas exchange rates were slightly higher for the lysimeter-grown plants.
    • Snowpack Density on an Arizona Mixed Conifer Forest Watershed

      Ffolliott, Peter F.; Thompson, J. R.; School of Renewable Natural Resources, The University of Arizona, Tucson; Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, USDA Forest Service, Tempe, Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
    • A Land Imprinter for Revegetation of Barren Land Areas Through Infiltration Control

      Dixon, R. M.; Simanton, J. R.; United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Western Region, Southwest Watershed Research Center, Tucson, Arizona 85705 (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
      A new minimum tillage implement, "the land imprinter," has been designed and fabricated, and is currently being tested. Its design is based on water infiltration control theory developed during the past decade. The land imprinter was developed primarily for establishing vegetation in barren land areas in semiarid and arid regions of the world. It simultaneously forms interconnected downslope and cross - slope corrugations that shed water and then infiltrate it precisely where vegetative growth is to be encouraged. This controlled short distance routing of water along short waterways into small reservoirs makes more rainwater available for seed germination and seedling establishment, and less water available for loss by surface runoff and evaporation. The imprinter has only one moving part, in the form of a massive compound roller and central axle which turn together as a rigid assembly during operation. The compound roller consists of two imprint capsules which are linked together on the axle shaft by an axle pulling clamp. The core of the imprint capsule is a hollow steel cylinder (1-m diameter and 1-m long) fabricated from 1.27-cm steel plate. A variety of imprint geometries are formed by welding short lengths of specially -cut steel angles (1.27 cm x 15.24 cm x 15.24 cm) to the outer surface of the cylindrical core. Ten imprint capsules with distinctly different geometric patterns of steel angles have been developed and fabricated. By pairing these capsules in as many ways as possible, 45 different geometric patterns can be imprinted. The patterns of steel angles perform a number of different tillage functions including (1) brush and soft rock crushing, (2) brush and rock imbedding, (3) runoff inducing and directing, (4) infiltration inducing and directing, (5) biomass concentrating, (6) seedbed forming, (7) surface and vertical mulching, (8) wind and water erosion controlling, (9) surface compacting, and (10) surface trenching and pitting. Advantages of the land imprinter as compared with alternative tillage methods include (1) greater stability, diversity, complexity, and precision of surface geometric patterns; (2) better control of point infiltration, runoff, erosion, and evaporation; and (3) greater utility in brush -covered, steeply - sloping, deeply gullied, and rocky land. The land imprinter should have widespread utility in both range and croplands because of its unique ability to mold runoff -watered seedbeds that increase the probability of seed germination and seedling establishment.
    • Root System of Shrub Live Oak in Relation to Water Yield by Chaparral

      Davis, Edwin A.; USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, Tempe, Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
      The root system of shrub live oak (Quercus turbinella) was studied in an initial effort to classify the major Arizona chaparral shrubs as potential users of soil water based on root system characteristics. The root system was of the generalized type with a taproot, many deeply penetrating roots, and a strong lateral root system. Roots penetrated 21 feet to bedrock through cracks and fractures in the rocky regolith. A dense network of small surface laterals radiated from the root crown and permeated the upper foot of soil. Because of its root system, shrub live oak is well adapted to utilize both ephemeral surface soil moisture as well as deeply stored moisture. Emphasis is placed on the importance of a knowledge of the root systems of chaparral shrubs and depth of the regolith in planning vegetation conversions to increase water yield.
    • Reducing Phreatophyte Transpiration

      Davenport, David C.; Department of Land Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
      Transpiration rates (T) of riparian phreatophytes can be high. Antitranspirant (AT) sprays can curtail T without the ecological imbalance made by eradication. Saltcedar (Tamarix sp.) and cottonwood (Populus sp.) in 15-gal. drums enabled replicated trials on isolated plants or on canopies. T of isolate saltcedar plants could be 2x that of plants in a fairly dense canopy. T for a unit ground area of saltcedar varied from 2.2 (sparse -) to 15.8 (dense-stand) mm/day in July at Davis. Extrapolation of experimental T data to field sites must, therefore, be made carefully. Wax -based ATs increased foliar diffusive resistance (R), and reduced T of saltcedar and cottonwood 32-38% initially and 10% after 3 weeks. R increased naturally in the afternoon when evaporative demand was high and if soil water was low. Nocturnal T of salt cedar was 10% of day T. AT effectiveness increased with a higher ratio of day: night hours, and with lower soil water stress. Therefore, AT will be most effective on long summer days in riparian areas where ground water is available.
    • Influence of Forest Density on Bedload Movement in a Small Mountain Stream

      Heede, Burchard H.; USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, Tempe, Arizona (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1977-04-16)
      In contrast to three ephemeral streams in the vicinity, Tony Bear Creek, a small perennial stream in the White Mountains of Arizona, showed strong relationships among parameters of hydraulic geometry. Distances between gravel bars and log steps showed an inverse relationship with gradient (r² = 0.95). Shape factor and width-depth ratio increased upstream (r² = 0.98 and 0.90, respectively), indicating depth decrease toward the headwaters. The longitudinal profile is concave, and small, infrequent channel bars suggest that sediment movement is small. In contrast to the ephemeral streams, Tony Bear Creek is thus judged to be in dynamic equilibrium. Proportion of log steps to total steps (gravel bars plus logs) was much smaller in Tony Bear Creek (about 16 %) than in five other mountain streams (about 50 %). While all other streams ran through dense forests, only 60% of Tony Bear Creek was in forest, of which 13% had been selectively cut. Thus, forest density determined the proportion of logs incorporated into the stream hydraulic system, which in turn affects bedload movement.