• Geomorphic Features Affecting Transmission Loss Potential

      Wallace, D. E.; Lane, L. J.; Southwest Watershed Research Center, Tucson, Arizona 85705 (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1978-04-15)
      Water yield studies and flood control surveys often necessitate estimating transmission losses from ungaged watersheds. There is an immediate need for an economical method that provides the required accuracy. Analysis of relations between stream order, drainage area, and volume of channel alluvium existing in the various orders is one means of estimating loss potential. Data needed for the stream order survey are taken from aerial photos. Stream order is analyzed using stereophoto maps. Stream lengths taken from the maps are combined with average channel width and depth data (determined by prior surveys) to estimate volumes of alluvium involved. The volume of channel alluvium in a drainage network is directly related to the stream order number of its channels. Thus, a volume of alluvium within a drainage network (with a known transmission loss potential) may be estimated by knowing the order of each length of channel and the drainage areas involved. In analyzing drainage areas of 56-mi² or less, 70 to 75 percent of the total drainage network length is contained within first and second order channels; yet, these constitute less than 10 percent of the total transmission loss potential of the areas. Analysis of stream order and drainage area versus volume of alluvium relations allows preliminary estimates of transmission loss potential to be made for ungaged areas.
    • A Sediment Yield Equation from an Erosion Simulation Model

      Shirley, E. D.; Lane, L. J.; Southwest Watershed Research Center, Tucson, Arizona 85705 (Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 1978-04-15)
      Sediment is widely recognized as a significant pollutant affecting water quality. To assess the impact of land use and management practices upon sediment yield from upland areas, it is necessary to predict erosion and sediment yield as functions of runoff, soil characteristics such as erodibility, and watershed characteristics. The combined runoff-erosion process on upland areas was modeled as overland flow on a plane, with rill and interrill erosion. Solutions to the model were previously obtained for sediment concentration in overland flow, and the combined runoff-erosion model was tested using observed runoff and sediment data. In this paper, the equations are integrated to produce a relationship between volume of runoff and total sediment yield for a given storm. The sediment yield equation is linear in runoff volume, but nonlinear in distance and, thus, watershed area. Parameters of the sediment yield equation include the hydraulic resistance parameter, rill and interrill erodibility terms, and flow depth-detachment coefficient and exponent.